Holding out for a better dispatching job?

SKC

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The only thing that bothered me about it though was sometimes it seemed like you had to reinvent the wheel all the time. It was by far the most challenging
Ancient cargo 727, night time, middle of the Amazon, no ACARS, no ASD, just a hand held GPS for nav (excuse me, a back-up to pilotage in that area) and a suitcase of cash to pay off crooked ground handlers. A bit more interesting than LBB-ELP. :)

I love my job and and take solace in knowing that there's certain things in the domestic world that are rock solid and won't change.

I don't think I necessarily learned how to dispatch better at a Supp, just that I learned about all the nooks and crannies of dispatching that I wouldn't have at a domestic.
 

OneBadLT123

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Ancient cargo 727, night time, middle of the Amazon, no ACARS, no ASD, just a hand held GPS for nav (excuse me, a back-up to pilotage in that area) and a suitcase of cash to pay off crooked ground handlers. A bit more interesting than LBB-ELP. :)

I love my job and and take solace in knowing that there's certain things in the domestic world that are rock solid and won't change.

I don't think I necessarily learned how to dispatch better at a Supp, just that I learned about all the nooks and crannies of dispatching that I wouldn't have at a domestic.
Trust me man, I know that all too well hahahaha.
 

uhdt

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Ancient cargo 727, night time, middle of the Amazon, no ACARS, no ASD, just a hand held GPS for nav (excuse me, a back-up to pilotage in that area) and a suitcase of cash to pay off crooked ground handlers. A bit more interesting than LBB-ELP. :)

I love my job and and take solace in knowing that there's certain things in the domestic world that are rock solid and won't change.

I don't think I necessarily learned how to dispatch better at a Supp, just that I learned about all the nooks and crannies of dispatching that I wouldn't have at a domestic.
Dang SKC....I was waiting for you to mention something about the Omegas failing everynight at sunset or how the Eurocontrol RAD compliant route from yesterday wasn't good today because it's the 3rd Friday of an odd numbered month and one airway became a CDR3!
You do more of on the fly dispatching at a supplemental than you do at a scheduled...like learning what to do when a station is basically VFR, except for that tempo of 300 Meters for the whole TAF valid time (EINN did that...never went below 8000 meters...)
 

Squirrel29

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OWW I wasnt trying to offend I was actually trying to stress having regional experience is important to moving to a major.

For anyone that just received their license. I would encourage them to do 2 years at both regional first then Supplemental. After 4 years they should be well rounded enough that getting a interview at a major would be no problem
 
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uhdt

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OWW I wasnt trying to offend I was actually trying to stress having regional experience is important to moving to a major.

For anyone that just received their license. I would encourage them to do 2 years at both regional first then Supplemental. After 4 years they should be well rounded enough that getting a interview at a major would be no problem
Good point Squirrel....and I'm not out to offend anyone either.
I work with folks that have never done sked...and had no idea about the OIS board or GDP's and how to deal with them, and we've had people come in from regionals and got their eyes opened with the non-sked side. Each side is unique, and experience in both is great.
 

propsarebest

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2 years at a 121 regional, 5 years at a non sched. Now at a big 135 outfit.

The experience at both places before was GREAT.
 

pinoyatc

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In my class we had a mix experiences. There was a few from the regional, some LCC / Nationals, and some charters / supplemental. There also was one with no prior 121 just 135 and one with only having 6 months at a regional. I just had a friend get picked by another major with just a few years of supplemental experience. Don't feel like you have to go the regional route to make it to a major. What really matters is if you have a brain to make logical decisions and the right attitude. They will teach you everything else.
 

polarjet205

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Just like the old saying goes when buy a house... location, location, loacation... the same thing holds true in aviation... who you know, who you know, who you know...

but ya better have the time in with some heavy equipment to even get past the HR screening.. with just 4 years. The school ya went to means nothing, but the company you have been with can mean alot... with such a small community, word between managers gets around, way outside the normal hiring process and thats " money" in this business..

As far as pay goes, most people stay where they are after 10 years, because experience means nothing to another airline if you move, short of going into management, you will take a hugh pay hit and get all the crappy schedules all over again.. IMO, its one of the biggest problems in aviation for the individual dispatcher, certainly this is one of the last industries that makes one start over each time they move to another carrier.. but thats another thread thats been beat to death..

I for one searched for a long time for a civilian contractor position supporting military flight ops... the pay & benefits are outstanding, the job is very similar to dispatching, they are here in the states or overseas if thats your thing, with little of the other negative issues associated with working for 121/135.. no more cummuting, fighting/ hoping for a seat home or to work, or trying to take the family on a free vacation with impossible full flights... it's easier now to just buy tickets and know your most likely getting where you want to go.

The romance of airline work sure is not what it used to be for anyone...
 
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polarjet205

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Other ways to use your dispatching skills and more $$$

If it's so miserable, go do something else.
I did along time ago.. Flying military is like Supp on Steroids... alot of neat places, sudden missions, enroute refueling is like flight planning to a distination in the sky, then releasing to a target or landing..

It takes alot of work to finding these hidden jobs, as they don't even call them flight dispatchers, or other airline type names, you have to read the job details and model your resume and cover letter to make the case...

6 Figures is very doable on these type of positions.. So I for one will not be looking back to civilian flight ops.. thought my time there was very rewarding..
 

rod guhzhinya

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Took me 7 years before I landed at a Major..this is a "pay your dues" industry, gotta pay your dues son!
 

Mercyful Fate

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A lot

AKADX

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I know this is an old thread, but thought I'd add something for the newly certificated people.

Don't overlook corporate dispatching. A surprising number of large corporations have internal dispatch and entire aviation units. I got a job 2 months after being certified as a dispatcher for one of the world's largest oil companies. With OT, I'm on schedule to make almost $90k this year as a starting wage...3-4 times as much as offered at regionals when I was applying.

I'm not bragging, but it CAN happen. Just don't pass something up because you don't think you'd get it. Look at large businesses, not just airlines.
 
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