Holding out for a better dispatching job?

turnbub

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Just have a question for you guys here. I recently got my dispatching license in May. I am still employed however I want to dispatch. I have received offers from great lakes, express jet, gojet and sky king. I have declined everyone because the pay scale is so low compared to my current job. I still have bids out at major airlines but the question for current guys, do I really need that regional experience first?
 

SKC

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No chance at a major carrier in dispatch with no experience. The only way in without experience is to get hired in another position, put some time in there, then try to transfer into dispatch.

You will not be able to go straight in with zero experience.
 

AcarsMe

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I concur with SKC...
Most majors will want 3-5 years before you'll even be considered.
 

brokedash

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Agree with all three of the above. 3 years for a major to even look at your resume .
 

homerjdispatch

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Your attitude is a lot like his... Brag about all the offers, but turn down all the jobs... If you are serious, take the job and get the experience. Otherwise, GTFO!
 

uhdt

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Your attitude is a lot like his... Brag about all the offers, but turn down all the jobs... If you are serious, take the job and get the experience. Otherwise, GTFO!
Not quite the way I'd put it, but Homers right...if you want to dispatch take a dispatch job and get the experience, and take your lumps like the rest of us have. Just because you have a dispatch ticket it doesn't mean you know how to dispatch...that's just a ticket to start learning.
 

Kittyhawk1048

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I agree with SKC you have to get your feet wet in the regionals before even thinking about the majors
 

Mercyful Fate

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Same in the dispatch world as it is in the pilot world.....No way you will walk into a sweet gig with a major right off the street...Plus, if you want to work for a major, get into line.....There is not a shortage of dispatchers at the regional level waiting for positions at the majors.
 

polarjet205

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There is a heck of line however waiting to get a regional job... schools are pumping them out with rose colored glasses as they always have... I would bet this poster was promised a six figure career on no time....
 

uhdt

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There is a heck of line however waiting to get a regional job... schools are pumping them out with rose colored glasses as they always have... I would bet this poster was promised a six figure career on no time....
Get yer Kool Aid here....
 

Squirrel29

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I can understand not wanting to go somewhere due to less pay then you are making now. But like the other said you do need the experience befor moving to the majors. One option I would suggest is with a Cargo or Supplemental charter carrier some hire without experience and the pay is better then regionals. But on the flip side the connections you make at the regionals will actually help you more then at the Supplemental carriers. Experience you gain varies. You learn more at Supplementals about actual dispatching but at regionals you learn airline operations better.

If you goal is a major then you might need to bite the bullet for a year or two and work at a regional.
 

BigFellor

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I can understand not wanting to go somewhere due to less pay then you are making now. But like the other said you do need the experience befor moving to the majors. One option I would suggest is with a Cargo or Supplemental charter carrier some hire without experience and the pay is better then regionals. But on the flip side the connections you make at the regionals will actually help you more then at the Supplemental carriers. Experience you gain varies. You learn more at Supplementals about actual dispatching but at regionals you learn airline operations better.

If you goal is a major then you might need to bite the bullet for a year or two and work at a regional.
This man speaks the truth. Even mainline pay scales could mean a pay cut for the first year after you've been at a regional for any length of time.
 

WalterSobchak

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Networking within the industry cannot be understated. Pay your dues and make connections while you're at it.
 

SKC

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This man speaks the truth. Even mainline pay scales could mean a pay cut for the first year after you've been at a regional for any length of time.
Truth.

I had been at a Supp for 8 years and took a 20K pay hit when I moved to a major since I had to start as an assistant. Upgraded six months later and was back to my previous (Supp) pay rate by year 2.5. Could have eclipsed it quicker had I been an OT whore. :)
 

onewithwings

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There is a heck of line however waiting to get a regional job... schools are pumping them out with rose colored glasses as they always have... I would bet this poster was promised a six figure career on no time....
That's what they did in my class. Consequently I am the ONLY graduate from my class that is working as a dispatcher. I'm STILL doing my time at a regional after 14 years. (And just so you know, income will never reach 6 figures at a regional.)

~OWW~
 

onewithwings

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You learn more at Supplementals about actual dispatching but at regionals you learn airline operations better.
I understand this is one man's opinion but I wouldn't bet the ranch on that statement. Maybe for a CAT I fleet but that doesn't apply to a CAT III fleet....just sayin'

~OWW~
 

uhdt

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I understand this is one man's opinion but I wouldn't bet the ranch on that statement. Maybe for a CAT I fleet but that doesn't apply to a CAT III fleet....just sayin'

~OWW~
I don't think there is a right or wrong comment on this.... Squirrel29 is correct about a supplemental...there's a lot of diversity in the flying. You may be going to Orlando one day and then sending the flight to the deepest parts of Africa or some other off the wall place. At a scheduled carrier (regional or whatever), you're going to learn how the ATC system works, know what to expect (as much as possible anyway), experience CAT II and III operations, and live in a more controlled setting with the flights. I'd consider scheduled operations as controlled chaos, and supplemental as uncontrolled chaos. My prior carrier did supplemental, scheduled and flag (also ETOPS) and my current is supplemental, so I think I can weigh in on the subject :)
Regardless, Dispatching is a great job if you have the mindset for it...
 

pinoyatc

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After working in the flag and supplemental world for 6 years, I'm now at a major. Domestic dispatch at a major is boring as hell. I know I'm a worse dispatcher now.
 

OneBadLT123

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I don't think there is a right or wrong comment on this.... Squirrel29 is correct about a supplemental...there's a lot of diversity in the flying. You may be going to Orlando one day and then sending the flight to the deepest parts of Africa or some other off the wall place. At a scheduled carrier (regional or whatever), you're going to learn how the ATC system works, know what to expect (as much as possible anyway), experience CAT II and III operations, and live in a more controlled setting with the flights. I'd consider scheduled operations as controlled chaos, and supplemental as uncontrolled chaos. My prior carrier did supplemental, scheduled and flag (also ETOPS) and my current is supplemental, so I think I can weigh in on the subject :)
Regardless, Dispatching is a great job if you have the mindset for it...
After working in the flag and supplemental world for 6 years, I'm now at a major. Domestic dispatch at a major is boring as hell. I know I'm a worse dispatcher now.
Working for a major, regional, and supplemental airline I can pretty much agree with these statements.

Supplemental flying can be a whole different ballgame in terms of the randomness that happens. My favorite time dispatching was supplemental. The only thing that bothered me about it though was sometimes it seemed like you had to reinvent the wheel all the time. It was by far the most challenging and in my opinion REAL "dispatching"
 
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