Turns around a point

ClassdAviator

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Just curious. Are turns around a point executed with a flight path at an equal distance from the point and correcting for wind ,or would it have a flight path that maintains the point on the wingtip at all times and not correcting for wind. I have heard both these explanations of the manuever. I feel that the first one is logical for obvious reasons ( traffic patterns ). thanks
 

zulua320

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You need to stay an equidistant from the point -- ref the PP PTS if anyone questions you on that. Maintaining the same point on the wingtip is the procedure for 8s-on-pylons.
Z
 
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bobbysamd

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Your first comment is correct. Turns around a point are a ground reference maneuver in which you maintain a constant radius around the point, correcting for wind. Your second comment about keeping the point on the wingtip sounds more like eights-on-pylons.
 

A1FlyBoy

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Turns Around A Point

A training maneuver, the airplane is flown in two or more complete circles of uniform radii or distance from a prominent ground reference point using a max bank of 45 degrees while maintaining a constant altitude.
 

Pilotadjuster

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Turns around/about a point

Yep, Eights On Pylons are still in there (had to do them last month for comm).

Turns AROUND a point are in the PP test. They involve keeping the aircraft a constant distance from the point throughout the maneuver.

Turns ABOUT a point are not in the PP test, but still a good control excercise (they are described in the Airplane Flying Handbook), and involve keeping the wingtip reference on the point, as you do for eights on.

PA
 

Wiggums

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Fly a turn around a point using the arc method. You'll be able to keep your eyes out the front, where the should be. I don't remember what the PTS says, but most common student error is looking at the point 100% of the time. :(
 
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