Student Pilot Equipment

cletislj04

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I am starting my flying lessons soon, and I was wandering what equipment do I need to start and while i'm in training? Thanks
 

bobbysamd

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Pilot equipment

Assuming your trainer has an intercom, you want to purchase a good quality set of headsets, something like David Clark H10-30 or 40s. But before you whip out the plastic, do plenty of shopping. Don't buy headsets from a place like Sporty's because he charges full retail. You can find headsets at discounted prices from such places as Marv Golden's Aircraft Parts,http://www.marvgolden.com or Chief Aircraft Parts, http://www.chiefaircraft.com . I bought mine from Chief because they were a little cheaper than Marv Golden. This was 15 years ago, though. I suggest you spend the extra money to buy a name brand. It'll pay in the long run. Good headsets wear like iron.

But, before you do any kind of shopping, be sure you want to forge ahead with flight training. Otherwise, you may find yourself buying an expensive item that you will never use again.

Finally, it's easy to go hog wild on pilot accessories. Especially kneeboards. Take it slow and follow your instructor's suggestions.

Good luck with your training.
 
T

TDTURBO

If you plan on flying awhile, you should bag the David Clarks and get a good headset like the Lightspeed ANR 15's or 20's. You won't regret it, they cost a little more but they blow away DC's. IMH(humble)O of'course.:D
 

A1FlyBoy

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Enough
Your instructor will either give you supplies from the school ( books, aircraft pilot operating handbook ) or actually take you to the FBO/pilot supply store to get materials.

Most good schools don't require you to buy a headset and will supply you with one while in initial training.

At the very beginning all your really need is the DESIRE and MOTIVATION to fly.

Bells, whistles and laying down serious money on headsets and flight bags comes when you know this is for you and you have several lessons under your belt.

Good luck and have fun!
 

rjdreamer

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School stuff

I aggree with bobbysamd concerning the DC headset. However, as a Loadmaster that's pretty much what I'm used to. Which ever you feel comfortable with. As for price, like everything else:
1. If it's related to aviation,$$$$$$$!!
2. You get what you pay for.
It all comes down to personal taste and comfort zone. But, be sure this is what you're wanting to do. This is what I have in my bag:
Brown leather catalog case. (airline style)
Mini E-6B flight computer
DC headset H10-30
Jepp trifold knee board
Mini mag
Plotter
Clip on light w/ changeable lens(for night and as a spare)
Extra batteries
Masking tape (to cover a failed instrument)
Sunglasses
Calculator
Pilots pocket handbook
Extras: rolaids,gum,crackers,bottled water,leather flying gloves,pens,pencils,notepad.
Hope this helps and good luck in ur training!
Dave
 

avbug

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Does that flight bag come with a forklift to get it in and out of the airplane?
 

ShawnC

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Well for me, my flight bag only had a few things in it (and for the most part still only has about that much) I would get a small flight bag:
Buy a Cencal Logbook cover it that keep:
Your logbook, Sectionals, checklists, medical and certificates.
Get a fuel testers, the ASA plastic one would work.

I also kept a copy of the PTS (I still keep a copy around the house) and an AFD.

Now for a headset, I use Avcomm, they have the quality of a DC, but at a much cheapers prices (even there bare basic is pretty good). I personally use the Avcomm PNR-900.

Otherthan the kit that they give you, thats about it, one more book that I would get is the Rod Machado's Private Pilot Handbook. It will help you understand alot of the topics that you are required to know for the written and practical tests.

Anything else just go with you IPs recommendations.
 
T

TDTURBO

rjdreamer,

Masking tape to cover up a failed instrument?

Do student private pilots practice partial panel these days? Or is your CFI a masocist? Just curious............

Sounds like alot to absorb for an initial rating.
:eek: :eek:
 

rjdreamer

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school stuff

Some days I feel like I need a forklift. That's not half as much as I'm required to take with me when I fly as a Loadmaster in the Air Guard!! Now That requires a forklift.!!Wew. The tape isn't really used to practice partial panel, but in case of an actual failure. Forgot where I read that not too long ago. Private Pilot or maybe AOPA Flt Training mags. Everyone that had an actual failure said they wish that they could have covered the failed instrument to prevent them from using it and prevent brain readjustment during an actual. Food for thought. Fly and have fun!!
Dave
 

bobbysamd

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Instrument "failures"

What ever happened to those suction-cup devices and those thin plastic devices that look like Dixie Cup lids for covering instruments? I'd use those instead of masking tape.

Once again, follow your instructor's suggestions. I agree with the above about such things as a flashlight (or two), plotter, E6-B and a SIMPLE battery/solar powered calculator for arithmetic. Unless you are a student, I'd keep my logbook in a safe place at home.

Unless kneeboard designs have improved in the last several years, I'd be careful what I buy because they end up being so much junk. I tried to balance the boards on my lap and I felt uncomfortable. Then, I never felt that I had enough surface area when I tried the military-style battery-powered strap-on board. My instructor had told me just to fold out the sectional and place it on my lap. He was right all along.
 

ShawnC

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As far as knee boards I have pretty much tried them all (a couple of friends of mine let me barrow theirs, and I have bought a few over the past couple of years) I found that in controlled airspace you need one just to right down the information that is thrown at you (freqs, clearances...), other than that I rarely used it. I found the best with the most writing area are the just plain ones with the straps. None of that extra stuff did I ever really use and in most cases they just got in the way.

Flashlights, get one, but get a Maglite (AA powered one), they will last forever.

Foggles... you don't need them, and if you do they generally provide them for you.

Cheap calculator great thing to have in your bag it makes flight planning alot easier, I like the little $4.99 Sharp because it has a little flip over cover that you can put on.

TDTURBO... Some do, the point of it is not to use the panel during the partial panel though, I know many have done simulated ASI, or VSI failures, its just a matter of how extensively they want to train you.
 

FlyinBrian

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Get your instructor's recommendations

You instructor is the best person to answer this quesiton, but I'll throw in my .02...

Don't buy too much. Most of us laugh at student pilots who go out and buy evey little gadget in the Sporty's catlougue. My "kneeboard" that I used through my instrument training was a big clipboard from on office supply store, one of those big ol' "jaws" kind of paperclips, and some checklists taped to it. total cost was probably 5 bucks. If you want to buy a nicer one that straps to you leg, get a very simple one, and one of those springy pen/pencil holders. In my experience, the big 'ol trifold ultra whizbang Kneeboards just get in the way in the cockpit. All you really need is a surface to write on. When you get to your instrumnent rating, buy a yoke clip that you can velcro a kitchen timer too. And buy the timer at Radio Shack, not out of an aviation catalog. A simple kneeboard and a yoke clip is all you'll ever need. If you go to the airlines, the yoke clip is all you'll ever use.

Also, it's not necessary to lug every aviation book you own around in your flight bag. When I go out to a plane, I have my headset, a chart, and my certificates. Especially if you're flying a 152 in the Phoenix summer, go light!!!
 

avbug

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RJ,

Rather than masking tape, you might try carrying some stickum notes. Aside from covering instrument faces and not gumming up the glass, they can be used for making frequency notations and about a million other things. They keep kids entertained, and don't take up much room.

When I was flying air attack, two of us in the cockpit would be manually managing and controlling 30-50 aircraft at a time, based on radio calls only. That was done in a very small parcel of airspace, with five or more frequencies in use continually, and simultaneously. Cockpit workload was high, and we communicated via stickum notes. When one had a message for the other, we'd jot it on the note, and paste it on the other's clipboard, kneeboard, instrument panel, canopy; where ever. That avoided interrupting the other guy.

Also works for takeoff data, puting airport or runway info in a handy easy to spot place, etc. Much better than masking tape, and you don't leave sticky stuff all over. Just a thought.
 

ILLINI

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Here's the advice I gave to all my new private students. Flying is expensive, and unless you have money to throw around, this is all you'll need to start out with:

* Headset - Most larger schools will have a cheap loaner that you can borrow until you decide that flying is for you. (Bring some alcohol pads with you to clean the ear cups off) Belive it or not, there are people that go spend $300 on a pair of headsets only to find out that they don't really like flying as much as they thought. When you do decide to buy your own, shop around for what is right for you. If there is a pilot shop on the airport you will be taking lessons at, tell them you are in the market to buy a new headset but would like to try a few out before you spend all that money. They might let you test a few out during your lessons.

* Knee board - I've seen and tried them all, and still haven't found the perfect one. I literally have about 6 knee boards in my closet collecting dust. After all the money i've spent trying to find the right one, i'm right back where I started out.... $1.50 clip board from Office Max. You'll find that anything aviation, even if its the same thing you can find at an office store, will cost 5X more. A normal clip board with a nice storng clip, will hold a note pad, flight plans, and folded sectional very nicely. Use some velcro to hold a pencil to the clip, and tape some cheat sheets to the back side of the clip board. Include light gun signals, an airport diagram of your training airport, wind component chart, airspace, etc. You can use a Xerox to shrink them.

* Books - Current FAR/AIM. You probably won't need this right away, but it will be a must. Also available on the internet. Current copy of the PTS which is also available on the internet. Airplane Flying Handbook FAA 8083-3, Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge FAA AC 61-23C, and a copy of your aircraft's POH. My advice would be to stick to FAA publications. An examiner can't disagree with what the government says. Also current A/FD and sectionals. Ask your instructor when you'll need these. They do expire and you don't want them to expire just before you need them and have to buy more.

* Misc. - E6B, I prefer the mini one as well just because you can carry it easier. Don't waste your money on one of those electronic ones. You will need to know how to use the manual one anyway, plus many examiners have the habbit of stealing your batteries come check ride time. Mini-Mag flashlight with some colored lense filters. Mag sells a package with the mini mag, filters, and a hand strap, or you can do what a student of mine did. He just got some transparent colored celophane and some plain Scotch tape and stuck that on top of the clear lense that came with the flashlight. The celophane changes the color and the Scotch tape difuses the light to make it softer on your eyes and gets rid of the "dark spots". I actually liked this better than mine! A VFR Plotter to plan cross countries once you get to that stage in your training. A cheap calculator for when you get dumb and forget how to add. A logbook. If you plan on making this a career, you might as well get one of the professional ones. Just remeber to keep it neat! I recommend you fill it out and then have your instructor sign it. This way you don't have 20 different types of handwriting in YOUR logbook. Use black ink and never use white out. And finally, a flight bag to carry all this cr@p. These can get kinda expensive, but they are nice because they have a compartment for just abouteverything. If you want to save some cash, just use a normal duffel bag. Oh and throw some extra pencils in there while your at it! Notice I said "PENCILS" and not "PENS"! This is one of my biggest pet peeves, and other instructors out there would agree with me. I can't stand it when a student is holding a pen in their hand, and then they go to adjust the power or mixture or pull carb heat and mark up your brand new pair of dockers! Arghhhhh!

Again, save some money and buy as much of this stuff from an Office Max or Target, and shop around on the internet for the rest - prices can vary quite a bit. Hold off on the toys like GPS and transcievers for a while cause you more than likely won't be able to use them that much during initial training. Oh, and if you do use suction cups... don't push so darn hard. I had a student put his thumb right through the AI because he was pushing so hard!

Well, I know this was long, but I hope it's what you were looking for.
I
 
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Pilotadjuster

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$.02

All good advice; particularly, don't buy too much. I have heard the DC headsets are the best, though you will hear many many opinions on that. I purchased a Marv Golden brand headset (Pilot manufactured) and am replacing it with a DC because one of the earphones is intermittent.

Anyway. Only other suggestion I would have is www.spinnerspilotshop.com I have purchased many things through them and they have consistently had about the lowest prices.

Good luck and fly safe!
 

rjdreamer

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Avbug,
tape's out, post it notes in! Thanks.
 

navigator72

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my $.02

I used to be one of those student pilots who carried everything in my flight bag. After a couple of hundred hours and hours of carrying that heavy bag around you will find yourself slowly taking out itmes not needed.
Here is what I think should be carried:

1. Headset (I prefer the DC H10-13.4's)

2. A small knee board for making yourself appear like you know cockpit management.

3. A Leatherman tool (you just never know)

4. a 2 D cell flashlight (plus a smaller one, you just never know)

5. A condom (you just never know).

That's all.....because it's a long way to Memphis
 

ShawnC

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A condom, don't tell me that you were one of those pilots that thought that flying helped you get girls?
 
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