Multi Comm, then single add-on?

PanAm24

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hi all!!

I'm working on my commercial right now, and I'm reaching the point where I transition to a complex.

Do you think training for the initial commercial in a twin would be too much to handle before flying a complex single? I have heard the ME COMM. ride is relatively easy (fewer maneuvers), but what do you guys think?

BTW. I am recently Instrument rated with 230 TT.

Thanks for your advice!
 

chperplt

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I did my ME COMM before my SE and had never flown a complex aircraft before. It took me a couple of hours to get the hang of things, but it certaintly wasn't a big deal.

The checkride wasn't difficult in my opinion.

Good luck
 

A1FlyBoy

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I completly agree with Chperplt, I also completed my multi-engine Commercial check out before adding the commercial single engine rating.

Not a problem and both should be straight forward rides.
 

328dude

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Same here. Did my commercial in the Duchess. Never really needed my single so still have yet to add it on.

My question is though, how hard is it to add it on. Beside's learning the maneuvers, whats left?
 

bobbysamd

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Commercial multi

Place my vote in the "yes" column. As a matter of fact, earning your Commercial multi before your Commercial single is very common. At Mesa, students earned their Instrument in the Bonanzas before taking Commercial multi in the Barons.

You've gained enough flight experience to be able to keep up with the airplane. In reality, flying the multi in normal ops is just like flying a single. Raising and lowering the gear is the same in either airplane. Treat the pairs of throttles, propeller controls and mixtures as one. It'll take a little practice to get on to sychronizing the props. What will be different are the engine-inoperative procedures. Learn them thoroughly and spend time on the ground doing dry time in the airplane, and you'll be fine.

Good luck with your training.
 

chperplt

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328dude

Not very hard at all.. A few maneuvers, a short field and soft field take off and landing.. My checkride start to finish was something like .8
 

skydiverdriver

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Yup, good plan. Under the old rules, you could actually save some money doing it this way, as you could add on the single commercial in a non-complex aircraft, since the twin is complex. I actually did my CFI ratings "backwards." I got instrument instructor first, then added multi, and last I added single engine CFI in a 152. It worked great.
 

FlySacto

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skydiverdriver,

What rule change are you talking about? I did the commercial SE and ME in the "same" checkride last year. I flew a C-172 to do the single engine manuevers and jumped into a B-95 to demonstrate complex aircraft operations. Once that was done, we departed the pattern and I flew the multi-engine manuevers to finish up. The examiner wrote up two tickets and had me sign and hand back the SE commercial in exchange for my SE/ME commercial license. I didn't have to fly an approach since I flew a twin for my IA rating. Be advised, to pull this off you must have a private ME rating since the examiner usually won'tl assume responsibility as PIC during the checkride.

FlySacto
 
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