Job Situation

Medivacer

Putting my time in.
Joined
Dec 9, 2001
Posts
92
Total Time
< 0
I asked about a month ago about Jobs. It was pretty bleek, now it seems to be picking up.

I'm in Northern Canada, and I'm starting to convert all my lisences to the FAA. (Yes I'm an American).

I have about 300TT with 40 Multi.

Anything out there?

Many thanks.
 

MYFpilot

SDSU Super Fan
Joined
Dec 1, 2001
Posts
273
Total Time
6700
It is time young skywalker you learn the joys of instructing.
 

Cornelius

Where's Pancakes House
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
475
Total Time
7000
Instructing is your only gig with that time. You can't even fly traffic watch unless you have 500 hrs.

c-ya!
 

Medivacer

Putting my time in.
Joined
Dec 9, 2001
Posts
92
Total Time
< 0
I was hoping on an Effo posistion, or perhaps whatever is out there.

I don't think it would be fait to future pilots if I got my instructor rating. I know I'd only do it for the hours and I'm not the best teacher.

Keep the advice coming though.

Thanks,


CR.
 

Cornelius

Where's Pancakes House
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
475
Total Time
7000
Effo? I'm not sure what that is.

Don't sell your self short about instructing. If your intelligent and a talented pilot, you have something to contribute when your instructing.

Many of us feel inadequate while instructing but we do a pretty good job because we are professionals and want to produce some good pilots.

c-ya!
 

1900laker

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 30, 2001
Posts
117
Total Time
2700
Consider this,

If you plan on flying for the airlines someday, you probably will want to be a Captain eventually. While you won't be instructing your first officers on basic airmanship, you will undoubtedly be teaching them techniques and share your experiences with them to prepare them to be Captains eventually. It certainly couldn't hurt to get that CFI, because of some of the fundamentals of instruction you would practice and learn. Whether you instruct that much or not, I think that the CFI rating would still help you as a mentor down the road. Also, you never know until you try whether you will be good at something or not. Good luck
 

sydeseet

Huge Member
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
575
Total Time
5001
Dude,
No offense man but 340TT isn't going to get you an FO seat in anything bigger than a Bonanza. I'd reconsider your attitude towards instructing as it has been the path for the majority of us. Let your enthusiasm for aviation show through, put your students first, and treat the profession with respect and you'll do fine. Whatever you decide, you're going to be there for a while. In my opinion this isn't going to get better any time soon.
 

bobbysamd

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
5,710
Total Time
4565
Instructing

Perhaps my .02 viewpoint is colored because instructing is all I ever did in professional aviation. But I expended countless hours trying for commuter and other jobs, interviewed for a few, and have met plenty of folks who started off as instructors and moved on to the commuters. Having said that, you need to get your CFI for at least a couple of reasons.

I'll start with the practical, pragmatic reason. Despite what you've seen or heard, virtually NO ONE hires 300 tt, 40 multi pilots to be pilots. It just doesn't happen, my friend. That is reality. If you have your CFI, you'll have a trade which you can use to find work and continue working. Take it from someone who knows and has been there.

The second practical reason is commuters seem to like applicants who have their CFI. It's another good credential to put on your resume. Even if it isn't used, getting a CFI exhibits one's ability to pass a tough and involved practical test and to translate aviation ability into a learning experience for others. I.e., it demonstrates that you're trainable.

Finally, and perhaps more cerebral, is you just might surprise yourself about instructing. What makes you think you're not the best teacher? You might find that you're good at it. The CFI course includes the Fundamentals of Instructing, which teaches you how to teach. Moreover, you will learn more about aviation than you can imagine by having to prepare to teach your students and taking them on flights. After you've instructed for even a short time, you'll be amazed at how little you knew about aviation before you became an instructor.

Just some food for thought. Good luck with your plans.
 
Last edited:

C-135 Backer

Member
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
21
Total Time
5500
"You best learn--what you need to teach" Besides the wisdom of this expression instructing is an immensely satisfying experience.
 

Bluto

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 15, 2001
Posts
1,147
Total Time
>4000
Have to agree with you there Backer. While the benefits are not great, CFI'ing beats flying an RJ there and back with regards to personal satisfaction. Of course, the first time greasing it on in the RJ was nice, too. :)
 

Flynfish

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 27, 2001
Posts
79
Total Time
14000+
I understand why you don't want to instruct. I was in the same boat with about your amount of time. I started working on the CFI, and realized that it wasn't my cup of tea. I totally respect everyone who instructed, I just didn't want to go that route. I went to the local skydiving outfit and got on flying jumpers. It all worked out in the end. Good luck
 

Jetscream32

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 25, 2001
Posts
171
Total Time
6K
My roommate in flight school decided that he didn't want to instruct either. Figured he could get a job on problem flying skydivers or traffic watch, etc. Well, two and a half years later with no CFI he is loading boxes for UPS. I on the other hand got my CFI and CFII and started working at a flight school in NC. Got my MEI paid for (except DE charge) and lots of FREE multi time before that. Getting a job instructing helps you make CONTACTS with people that can only help you. Other instructors move on to Regionals and are usually more than happy to walk your resume in. Also, instructing out of a somewhat busier airport allows you to pick up some right seat time in a King Air or a Lear or something. The guys that fly those usually just need someone to work the radios, but fly with them enough and they may offer you a permanent gig as a corporate pilot making 40k a year to start. A little work now will help you a lot in the future
 

FL000

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
1,577
Total Time
1500
In case you didn't see it, here is a quote from Charles Lindbergh's The Spirit of St. Lous that I posted last week.

"I soon discovered that I was learning as much about flying as my students. A pilot doesn't understand the real limitations of his aircraft until he's instructed in it. Try as he may, he can never duplicate intentionally the plights that a student gets him into by accident. When you're flying yourself, you know in advance whether you're going to pull the stick back, push it forward, or cut the throttle. You think of a maneuver before you attempt it. But you're never sure what a student is going to do. He's likely to haul the nose up and cut the gun at the very moment when more speed is needed. If you check his errors too quickly, he loses confidence in his ability to fly. If you let them go too long, he'll crash you. You must learn the exact limits of your plane, and always keep him far enough within them so the wrong movement of a control will still leave you with the situation well in hand. You must learn not how high the tail should go in take-off, but how high it can go without disaster; not how to avoid a wind drift when you're landing, but how much drift there can be when the wheels touch, without a ground loop or blown tire resulting. And after you've learned how to keep a student out of trouble, you find that you've become a better pilot yourself. As you instruct your student in the primary art of flying, he instructs you in its advanced phases. In a gust of wind, or if the engine fails, or in any emergency, you handle your plane more skillfully than you ever did before."
When I began instructing, I thought that I'd be helping others learn while my own skills deteriorated sitting in the right seat. I could not have been further from the truth.
 

ILLINI

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
495
Total Time
++++
FL000,

Excellent quote!!! I couldn't agree with you more about becoming a much better pilot because of instructing. I too had my doubts about becoming an instructor, but I am so glad I went through with it. I'd have to say I learned just as much, if not more, as an instructor than in all my dual recieved together. It was tough work at times, but nothing beats sharing in your students excitement after their first solo or other "firsts" that they accomplish along the way. It's only been a little over two months since I left my job as an instructor, and there are already times when I miss it.
 

SF3CAP

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 21, 2001
Posts
78
Total Time
5500
I wasn't crazy about instructing at first, but it grew on me. I had the purple head man's expression on my face a few times while instructing private students. I'll tell you, though, I really learned instrument flying by teaching in actual conditions. Your students won't be the only ones learning in the cockpit. Just do it.
 

KingAirKiddo

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 8, 2002
Posts
465
Total Time
7500
I know this is starting to sound like a broken record, but I just have to add my $.02...you should definitely plan on getting your CFI and instructing. I found that I learned FAR more through teaching than I ever knew, or thought I knew before that. I instructed at a small airport where I made good contacts and led to my current job flying King Airs and Barons. Just do it...you won't be disappointed and might be pleasantly surprised at how much fun it can be. I know I was...

Best of luck either way...

KingAirKiddo
 

bigboy

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 13, 2001
Posts
132
Total Time
7000+
Medivacer said:
I asked about a month ago about Jobs. It was pretty bleek, now it seems to be picking up.

I'm in Northern Canada, and I'm starting to convert all my lisences to the FAA. (Yes I'm an American).

I have about 300TT with 40 Multi.

Anything out there?

Many thanks.
Hey Medivac . my brother just passed his CFI checkride yesterday and got a job offer today , he is #4 CFI in the family now , and he is very happy to start his new career. the other three are airline pilots and still very proud and active CFI's.My point is the satisfaction that you will get when your student passes a checkride is a great feeling .plus you will learn a lot as CFI.and your confidence level will skyrocket. and trust me not all of us started as a great teachers but experience will help you to become a good CFI. Best of luck to you .
 

Draginass

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 29, 2001
Posts
1,852
Total Time
5000+
Look at the big picture. Almost all your contemporaries have their CFIs and have instructed their fannies off and gained good PIC time.

Imagine you're the guy (built time by instructing many years ago) doing the hiring at a commuter and you have an CFI that's been doing yeoman duty instructing. And then they have you who's been flying banners or dropping skydivers with no CFI rating. You're both good guys. He asks YOU why you don't have a CFI rating - what are you going to tell him?
 

airgator

FUBIJAR
Joined
Dec 19, 2001
Posts
367
Total Time
3.14
If your know for sure you absolutely dont want to instruct you need to at least get a job at an FBO and start meeting people...alot of people. You're not gonna get a job by just sending out resumes with your time, you're gonna have to make friends and bum rides and hope things fall into place. I have less time than you and just got lucky landing a job as a Twin Otter FO.I know a ton of guys that are flying with majors and regionals that never got their CFI's. It's not for everyone. If you dont wanna pump gas and work at the FBO try hanging around jump zones and you never know who you'll meet. Good luck.
 

Cardinal

Of The Kremlin
Joined
Nov 25, 2001
Posts
2,308
Total Time
K's
$#)! %&#( $%*(# !@@^&%$# #*&%!!
I've bit the bullet, and start getting paid for my efforts in about two weeks. I count myself lucky to have a flying job in this climate, which is more than many can say. I had dreaded instructing, but finally came to realize that it was simply part of the aviation gig, at worst a pill that had to be swallowed, at best a place to make contacts, learn, learn, and learn, and build not only hours but experience. One thing I would like to pass on, if one approaches instructing with such a negative attitude that it might prevent them from being productive teachers, representatives of the industry, please, just skip it. Aviation does not need those who don't care. If you do a sloppy job of teaching and your student winds up out of gas, lands on a freeway and clobbers a family of four driving to grandma's house, well, just think about it. If we can't do it right let us not do it at all.
 
Top