Anyone with any Cessna 421 Experience?

Mr Freeze

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Have fun in the 421. I flew 404s and 421s. Be very careful with engine cooling. I have always pulled the throttles back one inch every ( TWO ) minuits for cooling. Plan your decents at least 3 to1 out of altitude for decent because the 421 just wont slow down.

Leaning the mixtures: If your airplane has a GEM, ( Graphic Engine Monitor ) use it on the hottest (egt) cylinder setting. For climb, lean it to 50 degrees below peak and 75 for cruise however; never cruise above 1590 degrees or below 1520. On the take off roll the fuel flow indicators should be at least 210 lbs / bottom of the white arc for takeoff with the boost pumps on low. At a safe altitude (500' agl) turn your boost pumps off and pull throttles and props to the top of the green arc and lean to 150 to 170 lbs for climb pitching for 130 kias. The AFM states 120kts but by doing this will help keep your cylinders cool especially in summer. Always plan a hot start if less than 30 minuits on your stop.

Winter opps: Watch that tail in icing conditions especially in 402 414 and 421. That tail will stall. The 404 can handle about 30% more ice than the others. Just try to stay out of it. I hope I didnt get to carried away. P.S. you will notice oil leaks. Chances are its a Tac Generator at the back of the engine. Merry Christmas.
 

DC-3TP

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Cessna 421

The 421 is a great airplane. I flew one for an air ambulance service for five years. I logged about 1200 hours in the Golden Eagle. I think it is the finest piston twin made. Some advice I can recommend is always fly the plane the same way all the time. If you have multiple pilots flying the plane, get with them and standardize your techniques. Don't be creative. Plan your approaches and descents before you get to the point where you need to descend. Stage cool before you descend and while you descend. Always keep the props pulling if possible until after you land. My technique on short final was to confirm down three green, prop sync off and yaw damper off, then Touch down, retard throttles to idle and then push props forward to increase drag to help slow down. I did this on every checkride I took and the Feds had no problem with it. Fly safe.
 

puddlejumper

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Just Curious

Mr. Freeze:

What was the thought process behind climbing at 50F rich of peak and cruising at 75F? Is it a % power thing? I guess that would make sense. In the T206, my philosphy was always to run richer in the climb due to the lower airspeed. Maybe I'm missing something.

Just think about all the advice we're getting here. We wouldn't think twice about paying $45/hr to our CFI for this stuff. Make a contribution!

-PJ
 

Mr Freeze

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50 degrees keeps your fuel flow at approximately 150 lbs. anything less than 130 pounds will cause pre-ignition and could lead to glazing of the cylinders.

For cruise you lean to 75 degrees below peak. At 30" of MP and 18 to 18.5 on the RPM. This lower power setting which you set in cruise requires less fuel and will give you a fuel flow of about 135 to 140 lbs. This setting will also keep your cylinders and pistons from forming that rough lead sand paper texture you find when your maintenance department is having to change out your cylinders every other hundred hr. Thease were the procedures we used in our 421-C mod that had a GEM Graphic engine monitor. This tecnique works well on A/C with high time engines. We avaraged a burn of about 50 lbs the first hr and 40 lbs every other hr.

All the other 421 drivers I meet did exactly the same thing. Our chief pilot took the 421 course at FSI and trained us by what he learned. I guess this tecnique is the closest thing to a Stokiometric mixture.

During taxi we always kept tha power set no lower than 800 rpm and no higher than 1100 especially with cold engines. This prevents the gear boxes from raddling. For takeoff we would gradually throttle up to takeoff power wich also prevents stress on your gear boxes and prevents any chance for over boosting. Through (1650) RPM, the bottom of the green arc we would turn the boost pumps on low, checking for atleast 210 lbs for takeoff which is at the bottom of the white arc for your fuel flow.

The figures mentioned are based on what we use for our airplane. I am sure that if you give the kind folks at FSI or Simuflight a call they would be happy to help. I hope this helps you PJ. Let me know if I answered anything for you

Regards. Mr Freeze. :cool:
 

puddlejumper

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Learning something new everyday

I'd be the first to admit my ignorance of geared piston engines. My only turbo time is in Cessna 206s and a retrofitted Arrow. On the T206 cruise climb is at 30" and 2400 rpm, the book calls for 120 lbs/hr but that runs the TIT too high. 130 lbs/hr winds up being about 100F rich of peak. I think this is only about 75% power, as full power climbs call for 200 lbs/hr 'til 17,000'. Best power cruise at 75% calls for 75F rich of peak for about 115 lbs/hr. I guess all of the conventional methods that I've come up with don't apply to a geared engine. I've never been through any formal training on the subject, although I am expected to give it to new owners for their insurance checkouts. (Pretty scarey) I'd love to figure out the stoichimetric ratios though. Most buyers of the new 206s are having the JPI monitors installed, I'll have to look into it.

Thanks, Mr. Freeze, for the reply.

-PJ
 

HMR

I Live by the River.
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Thanks everyone for the great info. It looks like we're getting a 421C and going to FSI in Long Beach. Now we're trying to figure out how much I should get paid. Anybody know what a pilot with 1000TT and 250Multi is worth? We're flying three days/week.
Thanks again.
HMR
 

Humblepilot

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Hmmmmmmmmm maybe 32,000-36,000 initially but don't limit yourself ask for $40,000 + and settle for lower. Also I think you are going to get a better education at SIMCOM/PAN AM in Orlando.

Just my 2 cents
Humble
 

stingray

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Ask some professional pilots in your local area about $$$$.Around 30,000+ sounds good. Though do remember how hard it is to get a descent pilot job, don't sell your self short.
I agree with the simcom deal in Olando with this type of training(as you know). Has your new boss given you any numbers yet?
 
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