trivial pursuit...

airnik

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FAR 47.15 (b) states "A U.S. identification number may not exceed five symbols in addition to the prefix letter "N". These symbols may be all numbers (N10000), one to four numbers and one suffix letter (N 1000A), or one to three numbers and two suffix letters (N 100AB). The letters "I" and "O" may not be used. The first zero in a number must always be preceded by at least one of the numbers 1 through 9."

In case anyone was wondering....
 

airnik

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whoops...

sorry - that was in response to the question regarding why planes can't have an "I" or an "O" in the tailnumber. my bad.
 

avbug

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Also, you won't find this in the FAR, but no N numbers may end with "key." The FAA made this determination based on experience, because every time a pilot called in on the radio and spelled out the N-number K-E-Y, the air traffic controller would invariably and unconciously reply, "M-O-U-S-E. Turn left, heading two seven zero, climb and maintain..."

With the newer generation of controllers this doesn't seem to have been a problem. In fact, they're probably sitting out there right now saying, "Whaaaaa?"
 

ILLINI

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Avbug, you're not serious are you?

Do you mean N12KEY would not be allowed? I don't think it would be allowed either, but not because it ended in "KEY", but becuase you can't end an N number with more than 2 letters. Or do you mean N751DW would not be allowed because "Whiskey" ends in "...key"? I know this is a "legal" N number because I used to fly it! Even though we didn't call it 751 Delta Whiskey, we called it 751 Death Wish!

It's still early for me and my sence of humor hasn't kicked in yet, but I just wanted to clarify that this was a joke.... right? If so, might I add..... I get it! HA HA HA HA!!!:D
 
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