Too much single time?

Alaska

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I might be getting a job flying a 207 in the coming weeks. I just wanted some opinions. I'm currently a CFI with over 1200 total and 170 multi time. The plan was to take the 207 job and wait for one of the regionals to call me back. (They say that I'm on the preferred list to be called back for class, if that means anything) Knowing it might take months to get called, is getting too much single time in a 207 bad for you? There is the opportunity to get into a twin also but it's kind of unlikely. Thanks for opinions!
 

flydog

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No such thing as too much time in anything except maybe a hot air balloon. Youll find most turbine jobs require high TT of around 3,000-4000 hrs and 500 multi for insurance reasons. Exec Jet wants 2500/500. Right now I would trade some of my 600 multi jet for the 1000 hrs TT I am short :)
 

captjim

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Take the job! If you had 3000 hrs of single then that would be a little problem, but you need the total time. Take it.:eek:
 

bobbysamd

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Single time

Place my vote in the "yes" column. You're better off flying an airplane of any kind for work than not, especially during these times when so many pilots are out of work. I believe the commuters look closer at your multi time than total time. They only care if your total time meets their mins. I'd say you're a bit light on multi time but if you're on a call list, that's good enough for me.

Lots of luck in your new job.
 

stingray

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TAKE THE JOB unless you are lucky enough to have a few jobs lined up, No such thing as to much single time, the important times are total time, multi time, IFR time, and time in the last 90days or 6months or 1yr (recencey) (I can't spell), (amount of time within a certain date frame) depends on the company. take what ever job keeps you flying the most . however the multi time is important so jump on multi time when it comes
Oh yea will you get enough hrs in the 207 to make the change worth it? how many hrs where you told that you would get at this new job? something to think about before the jump.
 

Pipeliner606

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CaptJim:

I have a question: not trying to be a smart *ss or anything, but, how do you figure that 3000 hrs in a single would be a bit of a problem? regardless of what type of aircraft it is in, total time is total time. I dont see how it could be a problem.
 

PHX767

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Back a few eons ago when I was on the interview board for a regional, I preferred not only the numbers - but how recently the multi time had been. This had a direct correlation to ability to adapt to the B1900.

reasoning: If the multi time is recent, there is more familiarity with flying a complex airplane perhaps in an IFR environment. The opposite of that is if a lot of your recent experience is in a single, it probably is in a VFR operation, and a lot slower and less complex.

My slant - Keep building TT, and maybe stay current in IFR ops and the ME airplanes. There is no such thing as too much experience at this stage of your career.
 

Pipeliner606

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I see. Basically you are saying that a bunch of single time is okay, as long as you are current and proficient with your multi, complex, and IFR ops as well. Correct?
 

LR25

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TAKE IT!

I would take the job any day rather than not be flying.

These are tough times, and everbody including employers know this. Take the job and be thankful that during this time of turmoil in the aviation business you can be flying.

Have fun.
LR25
 

TurboS7

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By all means take the job. When I had about your amount of time I had a job flying a C-207 for an air ambulance company. Within a year I was also flying their C-402B. You need all the PIC time you can get and the experience with making decisions will stay with you the rest of your career. When you start flying ETOPS stuff all that time on one alternator will help you with the reasoning in the long run. In other words when you are down to one engine over the North Atlantic and the APU won't start, you know from your single engine experience that the chance of loosing the other one is very minimal. Cheers.
 

Alaska

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Thanks to all for their insight. It's greatly appreciated.
 

TurboS7

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If you are flying a C-207 in God's country I don't feel a bit sorry for you. I figure for retirement I'll return to Alaska and fly out of Bethel or something. With all the fancy stuff everyone has in the airplanes now I couldn't handle it. What happened to the compass and clock and following a river. I flew once in formation from Togiak to Goodnews Bay with Burt Ball, I was following him in a snow storm. He knew every single turn and twist, and rock formation, we got there no problem. Amazing stuff.
 
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