There can be only one...

Rook

And shepherds we shall be
Joined
Dec 20, 2001
Posts
1,225
Total Time
?
No this isn't a cheesy Higlander Ref...Got left behind in my hometown trying to commute into DFW when a Jet Blue dude beat me out by like 1 minute. Just walked in behind him. My dumb luck. But the SAAB had only 10 people on board. Yesterday I got left behind in DFW trying to get home(more dumb luck) due to a weight restriction. The Crew was super cool about it and delayed the pushback trying to make it work so I could sit back there in one of the empty seats. But it didn't work. Of course if i were allowed in the jumpseat, I wouldn't even be posting this message. My company's unofficial policy is that we will take as many as we have empty seats. Of course only our own pilots or partners can ride in the cockpit jumpseat. Is there any plan to remedy this problem? Perhaps a Jumpseat ID card in the works? And does anyone know if UPS, FredEx or any of the other cargo airlines plan to open the jumpseat anytime soon? Open forum guys. Let's hear your opinions.
Rook

600' AGL Autopilot on (WHEW!)
 

EagleRJ

Are we there yet?
Joined
Nov 27, 2001
Posts
1,490
Total Time
5800
I agree. The policy of limiting number of jumpseaters to the actual number of jumpseats is outdated. The reason the airlines do it is that since you're flying for free, they don't want to risk taking a departure delay if a dozen jumpseaters show up and have to be checked in. I've never seen more than four pilots who want to get on the same flight, so the airlines should adopt a policy of taking no more than three times the number of jumpseats. That would accomodate nearly every pilot who wants to jumpseat, and would still protect the airline.
 

Tim47SIP

Serving for the USofA
Joined
Dec 5, 2001
Posts
1,157
Total Time
10,000
(someone correct me if I just screwed this up)
The number of jumpseats space is directly related to the pilots contract. At ASA, we can take as many jumpseaters as open seats, but at Delta, they can only take as many jumpseaters as available jumpseats. If there is only two jumpseats in the aircraft and 70 empty seats in the rear, only two jumpseaters get on. Now dont forget that Delta owns ASA (which I am sure you know) and the rules are completely different for both groups. The jumpseat authorizations are a contract negotiating tool used by mangement. As far as Fed EX and other cargo companies go, when and if they get their cockpit doors reinstalled and modified, then they can start jumpseating. I have been told by some Fed Ex jumpseaters that they were in the process of getting this resolved. Any of you cargo doods out there that could shine some new light on this subject? :confused:
 

ifly4food

ifly4food.com
Joined
Nov 28, 2001
Posts
956
Total Time
To Muc
EagleRJ said:
The reason the airlines do it is that since you're flying for free, they don't want to risk taking a departure delay if a dozen jumpseaters show up and have to be checked in.


No, that's what they say.
The real reason is that the companies use the jumpseat as a weapon, or take it "hostage" if you will during contract negotiations, requiring the pilot groups to "buy it back" with concessions. The jumpseat and the reciprocal agreements were never ours and they were never free. They were bought by the union.
 

enigma

good ol boy
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
2,279
Total Time
>1500
ifly4food said:


No, that's what they say.
The real reason is that the companies use the jumpseat as a weapon, or take it "hostage" if you will during contract negotiations, requiring the pilot groups to "buy it back" with concessions. The jumpseat and the reciprocal agreements were never ours and they were never free. They were bought by the union. [/B]
Absolutely, management hates to have pilots commuting around. I remember when DAL pilots could not even ride on their own aircraft as a jumpseater. DAL ALPA won the right eight or ten years ago. I don't know what they had to give up to get it, but I'm in their debt as I am a commuter.
A mobile workforce is independent, and management does not want independent workers. For example, my own company uses your permanent home as a hiring criteria; if you live in a base, you get a higher score than someone who lives elsewhere. Simply put, airlines never give pilots anything. Our union won the jumpseat for us. Now our task as ALPA members is to use our collective force and regain some respect in the screening process. But that is the subject of another post.
regards
 
Top