Speeding tickets

Aeronca

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I just got a ticket on my way to work today, 49 in a 35. This is the first one in 10 years. How bad is this going to hurt me in the future if I try to get hired by a regional.

Thanks for your replies.
 

Wiggums

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I wish my record only had one ticket...

I wouldn't worry about it. One ticket in ten years does not show a pattern of irresponsible driving. In fact, another member here showed up for an interview with a perfect driving record and the interviewers didn't believe him. I also know another guy who had about 5 tickets and 3 accidents in the last four years. He was able to spin it correctly at the interview, and he got hired. So, don't worry about it.

Doesn't your state have a defensive driving school that you can take that keeps it off your record? If not, and you don't mind spending a little cash, a lawyer can make it go away for you.
 

FlyinBrian

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Wiggums definitely correct. One speeding ticket is not going to keep you from getting hired. In fact, its affect on your competitiveness is probably negligible. I think it is important to add, however, that you very well may be asked about it on an interview, but as long as you answer the questions correctly, (You did it accidentally, but accept full responsibility for your violation of the law.) You'll be fine.
 

kilomike

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I'd go to traffic court to try to fight the ticket if possible. I know many people who got tickets and the cop never showed up in court so the judge dropped the ticket.

Also sometimes errors develop in the speedometer of cars. I just found out mine was way out of calibration and I'm going to get it fixed. I recently got a ticket and I was baffled as to why I'd even gotten it. I found out why and you can bet I'll be bringing in to traffic court the paperwork from the car dealership showing that there was an error on my speedometer causing me to inadvertently go faster than I'd thought I was going. Worth a try.

good luck!

kilomike
 

TSA ERJ

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If you do try to fight it in court, call and ask to change the court date from what the officer told you. Most officers try to get all of their cases for the week scheduled on one day one right after the other. If you change that, you have a better chance of him not showing up. Also, if he does show up, ask to see the calibration records for his radar gun. He won't have them and the case will be rescheduled, giving him another opportunity to not show up.
 

WIDGETBOY

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Don't worry about a speeding ticket. I got a speeding ticket about a month and half before my Delta interview. They asked about it and I told them truth. I still got hired so I guess if don't get to many and tell the truth you will be all right.
 

photopilot

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So if you got a ticket and the Judge dropped it do you admit to it or tell them you have never had a ticket?
 

Wiggums

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Others will say different, but I say if it's not on your driving record or your NDR, it never happened.
 

FlyinBrian

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I somewhat agree with Wiggums. I wouldn't volunteer the info. If it's not on your record, why would they be asking about it anyway? If somehow they found out or asked you straight up, I wouldn't lie about it. I would admit to receiving the citation and be truthful about the court's decision. One speeding ticket will hardly affect your candidacy at all, but getting caught lying about it will screw you hard. Is it worth it?
 

bobbysamd

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Speeding ticket

I'll second all the responses. Maybe meet with a lawyer and get his/her opinion. Maybe you can plead down to something less than 14 over the limit. See if driving school can make it go away completely. Do check on your speedo's calibration because that would be a good defense. The radar gun calibration is a good idea, but sometimes judges don't like that because you might come across as being a smartass. That's something to discuss with a lawyer.

Most importantly, I think, is to get your driving record a few months after the thing is adjudicated and see if the event shows up on paper. Once again, you need to run a background check on yourself so you know what "goods" the recruiters have on you. It helps to level the playing field. You should do that anyway when interviews may be imminent.

As a practical matter, though, one speeding ticket in ten years is pretty minor. Just prepare your spiel about how you learned from it, etc. and you should be fine.
 
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SentryIP

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No Problem

Aeronca,

If you only have one moving violation in 10 years, it's no problem. My advice to you is to admit to it, even if it's not in your NDR records because if somehow, someway your employer finds out about it later, you're toast. I did my own background check when I applied to the airlines. My three speeding tickets in three years from college weren't reported, but I listed them on the job applications, anyway. It's not a problem as long as you can explain that you were at fault and learned from it and a definite indication of maturity and honesty. I know I'm preaching to the choir on this one, but nevertheless, that's my input. It's really tough to get an interview and to blow a job opportunity on something they consider minor is just plain stupid. I was never asked about it during my FedEx or Southwest interviews and I had them listed on my job applications. Best wishes on your job search and Happy Holidays.
 

AWACoff

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I got 2 speeding tickets for 24mph over the limit in a 3 week span. Two months later Lakes hired me. Then I went to Air Willy and they didn't bat an eye. Just be honest. Oh, and by the way, SLOW DOWN, I did. Now if you guys would please stop tailgating the 25 year old grandma in the right lane...
 

KlingonLRDRVR

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CONTINUACE FOR DISMISSAL

Aeronca,
Here is a quick suggestion that may just save the violation from going on your record. After the 1990's aviation slow down I left aviation and went to law school and flew a desk. I did criminal prosecution for 5 years before I gave into my addiction and got back into the saddle. What I recommend you seek is "A CONTINUANCE FOR DISMISSAL" from the prosecuting attorney who would be in charge of your case if you plead not guilty and were to have a trial. A "CONTINUANCE FOR DISMISSAL" is usualy a one or two page document wherein the prosecuting attorney enters into a agreement with you to pay a "cost of prosecution" fee (usually the full amount of the ticket) and you agree to not get another traffic violation for a set period of time (often 6 months), after the time period with a "clean record" the ticket will be dismissed and the judgment of guilt will never be entered. Many prosecutors will acept this "cost of prosecution" because it saves the cost of a trial and it brings in revenue. In my state the "cost of prosecution" fees stay in the jurisdiction where the violation occurred. If the violator just paid the ticket the fine would be divided between the county, state and sometimes city and or highway patrol fund. As you can see there is an incentive to get costs of prosecution fees rather than fines as all the money stays in the jurisdiction where you work. Other states may very. In layman terms you are paying your fine amount and getting your case put into nuetral for a period of time to see if you can keep your nose clean, if so case dismissed, if not, you loose your "cost of prosecution" and you start over from scratch with a prosecutor P.O.'d becuse you wasted his time.

With your clean record it should be relativly easy to get. You need to contact the prosecuting attorney directly. Call the court administration office to get the number of the prosecuting attorney. The attorney will depend on where you were stopped, for instance if it was within a city limits it will be the city's prosecuting attorney. If the stop was out in the country it may be the county's prosecuting attorney. Different states have different names for prosecuting attorneys. Some states call them states attorney others district attorney and yet others county or city attorneys. What ever the name call the court administration number on the tickect for the number of the prosecuting attorney. Call him or her and explain you career situation. Ask if a "CONTINUANCE FOR DISMISSAL" is available and offer to pay the full amount as "cost of prosecution". He may send you the form ot be filled out and returned to him with the costs. He may even require you to make a statement of guilt so if you don't keep your nose clean it will be a slam dunk for him at trail against you. ALWAYS be respectful of the attorneys time as most are underpaid and over worked. Its is alot easier for them to get frustrated with you and tell you to pay the fine or see you in court. If I were you, I would physically go see him or her (not dressed in flip flops and shorts) and bring your checkbook. You can plead your circumstances and fill the form out and pay the "costs of prosecution" right there. Remember it is alot easier to tell you to pay your fine or got to court than to dictate a letter, send you a form and to tickle the file to see if you sent it back and then file it with the court. If you do it in person it just goes into the pile to be sent to court to put the case into nuetral. You have nothing to loose in trying this and it may save not only your record but your ultra discount for a clean record you may or may not have from your car insurance. Sorry so lengthy, I wish you luck. Just happy to be drivin a Lear rather than a desk. Cheers,

KlingonLRDRVR
 

bigboy

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speeding ticket

I had two speeding tickets in the past five years, Im working for a national airline , Just dont lie about it ,HR knows that no one is perfect so , Good luck.
 
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