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SkyWest showing videos of crippled folks and.......

wms

billSquared
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Generally I'm against these type of classes. Not because they aren't useful, but because they aren't uniformly applied. Tomorrow you will get the same call from scheduling for an illegal assignment that you got yesterday. You'll explain why it puts you over your duty limits and they will have a CP call you and tell you to fly it anyway because the company believes it is legal. Then they will self disclose to the feds and throw you under the bus. You must be professional, but for them it is optional. That is what really makes the class a waste of time.
Well put. The GED types on the OCC are the really need this type of indoctination also. It does nothing to place emphasis on higher standards for the frontline employees only to have them illegally abused by the back office.
 

inthegoo

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Here is just a part of the creed:

No one is more professional than I. I am a first officer - a member of the flight crew whose purpose is to keep my passengers, crew, and airplane safe. I am a leader. I am a professional. I am a First Officer.
 
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AEROSQUADRON69

Active member
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This is my FO. Ther are many others like "IT" but this one is mine. Without me, my FO is nothing. Without my FO, I am SOMETHING.

Just kidding.
 

Stifler's Mom

MILF...MILF...MILF
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I'm a little teapot
Short and stout
Here is my handle
Here is my spout

When I get all steamed up
Hear me shout
"Tip me over
and pour me out!"
 

yahooair

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I have worked in companies where they do the same thing for execs..costs beaucoup bucks and i am impressed an airline would actually spend money for something like this. who was the guest speaker? these things cost anywhere from 500k to over a mil if all employees attend.why are pilots going through this? they are not in management. usually for supervisors and upper management.
 

crj567

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Here is just a part of the creed:

No one is more professional than I. I am a first officer - a member of the flight crew whose purpose is to keep my passengers, crew, and airplane safe. I am a leader. I am a professional. I am a First Officer.
This is my rifle. There are many like it, but this one is mine. My rifle is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it as I master my life. My rifle, without me, is useless. Without my rifle, I am useless. I must fire my rifle true. I must shoot straighter than my enemy who is trying to kill me. I must shoot him before he shoots me. I will....

My rifle and myself know that what counts in this war is not the rounds we fire, the noise of our burst, nor the smoke we make. We know that it is the hits that count. We will hit...

My rifle is human, even as I, because it is my life. Thus, I will learn it as a brother. I will learn its weakness, its strength, its parts, its accessories, its sights and its barrel. I will keep my rifle clean and ready, even as I am clean and ready. We will become part of each other. We will...

Before God I swear this creed. My rifle and myself are the defenders of my country. We are the masters of our enemy. We are the saviors of my life. So be it, until victory is America's and there is no enemy, but Peace.


-I think this would have been far more motivational and and "team-oriented."
 

CFIT

Gimme your money
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Wow..... just wow.

For the first time we are thinking the same thing, Rez.



It's the same thing I said when I read the litter box liner from your glee club about the the guy that landed his emb145 on the planet Jupiter. I wanted so much to be part of that great organization that pays it's ad hoc journalists $140,000.00 a year of your dues money to write your motto statement, that hasn't figured the realm of fact checking, let alone the internet.

Yes Tim is ALPA, and so are you Rez.

I don't really support my "Student body Council" (as you put it) like I used to, and I am losing my faith in management, but when I see the crap from you and your BS group, I feel I'm better of without.

I would so much like to see my bretheren from ASA and my group develop it's own organization, just not ALPA.

Rez, your failed leadership of your cult membership is no better than my management, as they are obviously not looking out for the Regional Pilot. An expense, a bothersome need, but a need none the less. My airline needs pilots, your fun club needs dues.

And please, Oh please, make you response a series of numerous questions.
 

AEROSQUADRON69

Active member
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I have worked in companies where they do the same thing for execs..costs beaucoup bucks and i am impressed an airline would actually spend money for something like this. who was the guest speaker? these things cost anywhere from 500k to over a mil if all employees attend.why are pilots going through this? they are not in management. usually for supervisors and upper management.

There are NO select special speakers. Just other pilots trying to preach the good word....i.e. likely getting paid to travel around in suits vs flying the line. But not a 100% on this. We have heard numbers from 500K to a Million for just the captains side. Suppose thats why they continue to take away money from us.

This class should be mandatory in intial training. However as mentioned before by someone else....It will not change those who are already F**KED UP! They slipped by the interview process and here they are.

So good on iniative, but bad judgement for management.
Oh, and CC is some video(s). He can't even put on a tie as he talks about professionalism.
 

11thHour

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Did they hand out the knee pads at the class, or did you have to bring your own?
 

Rez O. Lewshun

Save the Profession
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For the first time we are thinking the same thing, Rez.
Let's see if that is true....



It's the same thing I said when I read the litter box liner from your glee club about the the guy that landed his emb145 on the planet Jupiter. I wanted so much to be part of that great organization that pays it's ad hoc journalists $140,000.00 a year of your dues money to write your motto statement, that hasn't figured the realm of fact checking, let alone the internet.
Nope....not true. we don't agree. That didn't last long at all....

The article in ALPA was good intentions gone bad and pilots trusting pilots. A legacy pilot (from who you outsource) recommended the fraud. It was pilots trusting pilots. It happened, it was wrong. ALPA pilots have a right to be angry. Let's see how ALPA addresses it in the next issue. Wouldn't that determine a level of professionalism? The ability to self reflect, admit mistakes, learn and move on?

Yes Tim is ALPA, and so are you Rez.
I am an ALPA member who realizes that being involved politically is critical to my career rather than being on a farce of a student council at Skywest. If ALPA was called another acronym I'd be a member of that. I want access to Cap Hill because that is where the decision are made that effect my as well as your career....

Skywest is a member of the RAA. That means YOUR master Roger Cohen, was on CapHill speaking against the profession concerning the Colgan accident. Click the following link and get an understanding of what pilots think of YOUR master Roger Cohen....

This Roger Cohen makes me want to puke



I don't really support my "Student body Council" (as you put it) like I used to, and I am losing my faith in management, but when I see the crap from you and your BS group, I feel I'm better of without.
What you are really saying is... you've resigned yourself to being a subject of Roger Cohen. He is your voice and representation. What is good for the RAA and Skywest is good for you.

And of course now you are changing your tune, whereas before you were a self described "negotiator" on the Student Council, now you THINK you are gaining some sort of autonomy by distancing yourself, all while ROGER controls your career... and you don't even get it.


I would so much like to see my bretheren from ASA and my group develop it's own organization, just not ALPA.
Another epic failure of thought... First of bretheren? That is hilarious. You are an independent contractor ready to undercut the next guy. You are no different than a sole proprietor plumber.

There are always a small clique at each airline, mine included, that think they can go it alone. It can't be done. There is no regional union for a reason. But since you think you are a smart guy give a general ASA/OO regional plan. Start with dues. How much? 1.95% What will that get you in terms of a budget? Let's here your pragmatic application of ideas.

Rez, your failed leadership of your cult membership is no better than my management, as they are obviously not looking out for the Regional Pilot. An expense, a bothersome need, but a need none the less. My airline needs pilots, your fun club needs dues.
Funny, all my fellow professionals believe that the regionals are taking over ALPA with more votes and they are wondering why they are funding it through higher salaries. So which is it? As a student council member how can you really know what is going on. The information you receive is selected, filtered and controlled. You don't even know what is reality.

My failed leadership? Yes, ALPA is comprised of humans. Humans in any made made organization such as govt, church, NGOs, companies, etc.. are going to have failures and successes.

What is interesting for the Student Council at OO is the gains from ALPA they get through legislation. Take the effects of the Colgan accident, whether it is the FAA Rev. Act or stand alone legislation.


In addition, here is an ALPA win that I bet OO pilots would like:

American Eagle pilots won a significant victory last week when labor arbitrator George Nicolau instructed American Airlines (AA) to permit 35 Eagle RJ captains to transfer to American immediately. Four hundred and ninety-two additional Eagle RJ captains with flow-through rights are permitted to transfer to AA, following the recall of a group of AA furloughed pilots.
Per the award, the arbitrator ruled that up to 244 of the senior Eagle pilots who transfer to AA are entitled to additional specified benefits and length of service for pay purposes retroactive to the dates when they should have transferred to AA, between June 2007 and March 2009. To offset the downstream injury caused by AA’s failure to transfer Eagle pilots at the appropriate time, Nicolau afforded an additional 824 Eagle pilots future pilot employment rights at AA.
Would the OO pilots like some sort of flow thru agreement to DAL and UAL? Do OO pilots sign up to be career student council members or are they really hoping to get hired elsewhere? Is a flow through a reasonable option to have? OO pilots will never have a flow thru option. I don't speak for D or U ALPA but I would squash any Student Council/OO effort to get a flow thru when there are plenty of ALPA regionals. But that is me...


And please, Oh please, make you response a series of numerous questions.
You are not used to questions. Questions are designed to get a person to think, consider and respond with decisions.

As a Burka Boy, you are not asked to think. You are manipulated, controlled and used. In addition, you are done so in such a way that you actually believe you are autonomous. When you were an avid supporter of the Student Council and a "negotiator" :rolleyes: you actually thought you were contributing and a "partner" at the table. When in reality you were a child sitting at an ironing board with a table cloth eating mac and cheese with cut up hotdogs, while the adults were at the club eating lobster and steak from the extra revenue taken from your hard labor because your work rules are an embarrassment. If I were marginalized this way, as you are, I would chide ALPA as much as I could too. It would help the denial.

You lack the courage and fortitude to tell Jerry to pound sand, that you are your own man and bring on your own autonomy. Your own voice. Have you ever heard the phrase, speak for yourself? You can't. Or even better you won't. You have grown fond of your chains and binds, fearful of how you will function if you actually had to self govern yourself. You are Roger Cohen's ball-gagged gimp.

You are not a professional. While many Skywest (JB and VA) pilots display professionalism everyday, professionals do not function as students. They are autonomous. They speak for themselves. They codify their own work rules.

So now your honeymoon is over with the student council and you put yourself to sleep each night with confident thoughts of an ASA/OO union. Again... let's hear your pragmatic application of idea to reality.
 

Rez O. Lewshun

Save the Profession
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An Air Line Pilot will keep uppermost in his mind that the safety, comfort, and well-being of the passengers who entrust their lives to him are his first and greatest responsibility.
• He will never permit external pressures or personal desires to influence his judgment, nor will he knowingly do anything that could jeopardize flight safety.
• He will remember that an act of omission can be as hazardous as a deliberate act of commission, and he will not neglect any detail that contributes to the safety of his flight, or perform any operation in a negligent or careless manner.
• Consistent with flight safety, he will at all times operate his aircraft in a manner that will contribute to the comfort, peace of mind, and well-being of his passengers, instilling in them trust in him and the airline he represents.
• Once he has discharged his primary responsibility for the safety and comfort of his passengers, he will remember that they depend upon him to do all possible to deliver them to their destination at the scheduled time.
• If disaster should strike, he will take whatever action he deems necessary to protect the lives of his passengers and crew.

An Air Line Pilot will faithfully discharge the duty he owes the airline that employs him and whose salary makes possible his way of life.
• He will do all within his powers to operate his aircraft efficiently and on schedule in a manner that will not cause damage or unnecessary maintenance.
• He will respect the officers, directors, and supervisors of his airline, remembering that respect does not entail subservience.
• He will faithfully obey all lawful directives given by his supervisors, but will insist and, if necessary, refuse to obey any directives that, in his considered judgment, are not lawful or will adversely affect flight safety. He will remember that in the final analysis the responsibility for safe completion of the flight rests upon his shoulders.
• He will not knowingly falsify any log or record, nor will he condone such action by other crew members.
• He will remember that a full month’s salary demands a full and fair month’s work. On his days off, he will not engage in any occupation or activity that will diminish his efficiency or bring discredit to his profession.
• He will realize that he represents the airline to all who meet him and will at all times keep his personal appearance and conduct above reproach.
• He will give his airline, its officers, directors, and supervisors the full loyalty that is their due, and will refrain from speaking ill of them. If he feels it necessary to reveal and correct conditions that are not conducive to safe operations and harmonious relations, he will direct his criticism to the proper authorities within ALPA.
• He will hold his airline’s business secrets in confidence, and will take care that they are not improperly revealed.

An Air Line Pilot will accept the responsibilities as well as the rewards of command and will at all times so conduct himself both on duty and off as to instill and merit the confidence and respect of his crew, his fellow employees, and his associates within the profession.
• He will know and understand the duties of each member of his crew. If in command, he will be firm but fair, explicit yet tolerant of deviations that do not affect the safe and orderly completion of the flight. He will be efficient yet relaxed, so that the duties of the crew may be carried out in a harmonious manner.
• If in command, he will expect efficient performance of each crew member’s duties, yet he will overlook small discrepancies and refrain from unnecessary and destructive criticism, so that the crew member will retain his self-respect and cooperative attitude. A frank discussion of minor matters of technique and performance after the flight will create goodwill and a desire to be helpful, whereas sharp criticism and peremptory orders at the moment will result only in the breakdown of morale and an inefficient, halting performance of future duties.
• An Air Line Pilot will remember that his is a profession heavily dependent on training during regular operations and, if in command, will afford his flight crew members every reasonable opportunity, consistent with safety and efficiency, to learn and practice. He will endeavor to instill in his crew a sense of pride and responsibility. In making reports on the work and conduct of his crew members, he will avoid personal prejudices, make his reports factual and his criticisms constructive so that actions taken as a result of his reports will improve the knowledge and skill of his crew members, rather than bring discredit, endanger their livelihood, and threaten their standing in the profession.
• While in command, the Air Line Pilot will be mindful of the welfare of his crew. He will see to it that his crew are properly lodged and cared for, particularly during unusual operating conditions. When cancellations result in deadheading, he will ensure that proper arrangements are made for the transportation of his crew before he takes care of himself.

An Air Line Pilot will conduct his affairs with other members of the profession and with ALPA in such a manner as to bring credit to the profession and ALPA as well as to himself.
• He will not falsely or maliciously injure the professional reputation, prospects, or job security of another pilot, yet if he knows of professional incompetence or conduct detrimental to the profession or to ALPA, he will not shrink from revealing this to the proper authorities within ALPA, so that the weak member may be brought up to the standards demanded, or ALPA and the profession alike may be rid of one unworthy to share its rewards.
• He will conduct his affairs with ALPA and its members in accordance with the rules laid down in the Constitution and By-Laws of ALPA and with the policies and interpretations promulgated therefrom. Whenever possible, he will attend all meetings of ALPA open to him and will take an active part in its activities and in meetings of other groups calculated to improve air safety and the standing of the profession.
• An Air Line Pilot shall refrain from any action whereby, for his personal benefit or gain, he take advantage of the confidence reposed in him by his fellow members. If he is called upon to represent ALPA in any dispute, he will do so to the best of his ability, fairly and fearlessly, relying on the influence and power of ALPA to protect him.
• He will regard himself as a debtor to his profession and ALPA, and will dedicate himself to their advancement. He will cooperate in the upholding of the profession by exchanging information and experience with his fellow pilots and by actively contributing to the work of professional groups and the technical press.

An Air Line Pilot the honor of his profession is dear, and he will remember that his own character and conduct reflect honor or dishonor upon the profession.
• He will be a good citizen of his country, state, and community, taking an active part in their affairs, especially those dealing with the improvement of aviation facilities and the enhancement of air safety.
• He will conduct all his affairs in a manner that reflects credit on himself and his profession.
• He will remember that to his neighbors, friends, and acquaintances he represents both the profession and ALPA, and that his actions represent to them the conduct and character of all members of the profession and ALPA.
• He will realize that nothing more certainly fosters prejudices against and deprives the profession of its high public esteem and confidence than do breaches in the use of alcohol.
• He will not publish articles, give interviews, or permit his name to be used in any manner likely to bring discredit to another pilot, the airline industry, the profession, or ALPA.
• He will continue to keep abreast of aviation developments so that his skill and judgment, which heavily depend on such knowledge, may be of the highest order.

Having Endeavored to his utmost to faithfully fulfill the obligations of the ALPA Code of Ethics and Canons for the Guidance of Air Line Pilots, a pilot may consider himself worthy to be called…an AIRLINE PILOT.
 

CFIT

Gimme your money
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This is so easy,

but again,

Tim is ALPA, as are you Rez,

blindly following your leader.....
 

CX880

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Did they hand out the knee pads at the class, or did you have to bring your own?
They were selling them for 2 bucks a piece. People that didn't want to pay for them were welcomed to leave. Of course no one left.
 

Ski Bum

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I have attended the Leadership class at SkyWest and I applaud the idea of providing the pilot group with training on the subject; however, the execution of the class was laughable. Everything from dressing up to attend it, to the fake invitation to leave class, to the dangerously oversimplified bullet points of very complex theories having to do with the human mind and group dynamics (the instructors completely missed some of the main conclusions of these studies), to the inexperienced instructors leading the class (too many grammatical errors to count…I am sorry, but how can you listen to someone rally on about professionalism when they start out with “I was in the jumpseat once and I seen…”), to the pledge (reminded me of dictatorial regime) meant it was a wasted day of training. (speaking of grammatical errors, how about that for a run-on sentence, good thing I am not teaching a class)

It reminded me of a C- high school class project. It could have been a great thing for our pilot group as I do believe we need some extra training…things are getting a little loose out there and I think it is up to us to pull in the reigns. It is just disappointing to see SkyWest not utilize the vast amount of resources available to it ($, experience, perhaps outside speakers instead of YouTube videos) to improve our pilot group rather than satisfy the FAA with a course thrown together by people whose world view consists of St. George, UT.

One other point is that just because you might have a “the company is screwing us” mentality does not mean that you are unprofessional. You can disagree with payscales, work rules, and scheduling practices and still be a professional pilot. This equation that somehow professionalism is tied to your happiness with SkyWest was perhaps the biggest aggravation to most of us sitting in class. In fact, professionalism has nothing to do with your union or company views, or happiness with your job, it has to do with your conduct on the job.
 
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Rez O. Lewshun

Save the Profession
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In fact, professionalism has nothing to do with your union or company views, or happiness with your job, it has to do with your conduct on the job.
Pilot must have a medium, format and resources to promote, protect and defend the Air Line Pilot profession.

Conduct on the job is correct. Professionalism is a choice. However, human dynamics state that positive conduct on the job will only last so long if professionals are being taken for granted and not respected.



In addition you can't have thousands of individuals with their own idea of what professionalism should be. This class was a failed attempt to correct that.

It was dictated and done as a top down, cram down. If professionalism is a choice then does it make sense that mgmt push the syllabus? Whereas if management had allowed the pilots themselves to create and define their own professionalism it would have been much more effective.

No doubt that the OO pilots make every effort to be professional and if they were given the latitude to define their own professionalism they would have done an above avg job. But management doesn't view OO pilots as professionals, that is why this class went down the way it did. Also, if management gave OO pilots the latitude to be professional, the pilots might actually demand more compensation.... as they rightfully should.

Consider.... does OO management really care about pilot professionalism? The pax? The govt (FAA)? If not them, then who? Who is concerned about pilot professionalism?

Back to 1000's of different pilots and their ideas of what is professionalism. How do you find commonality?
 
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Ski Bum

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I agree, it is harder to maintain a professional demeanor when the company you work for doesn't seem to value (I mean with actual money / QOL and not an email saying they do) your professionalism. Nontheless, I am a professinal pilot and I am going to do my job to the best of my ability everyday. I am also going to use all available avenues to change my companys' valuation of my professionalism.
 
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