Question about STARS

DLconnection

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 1, 2001
Posts
121
Total Time
some
I have a question about ARRIVALS (STARS). On some STARS the word, expect is underlined. By definition this means that u can expect to get clearance at that point/alt.
I am aware that if ATC told me to "decend via" the XYZ arrival, that I could descend down to the MEAs illustrated on that particular arrival. And if ATC told me that I was cleared for the XYZ arrival that I could follow the arrival on into the airport, but I have to maintain my last assigned ALT. until cleared to descent to a lower altittude.
My question is....how exactly does this expect come into play here? I assume that this means that I can expect to get cleared down to whatever alt. is illustrated, but I cant figure out why this expect is necessary. Can someone clearify the significance of the "expect " that is written on several STARS?
 

Buschpilot

Large Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2002
Posts
114
Total Time
5500+
A couple of reasons:

1. Descent planning - higher performance aircraft require that the pilot determine when a descent is necesary to meet that "expected" altitude, versus small aircraft who usually take a descent whenever its given.

2. Lost Comm - Remember the acronym MEA? (and I don't mean minimum enroute alt.)

I'm sure there are other reasons, as well, but these are what go through my mind when I see that "expect" word.

B
 

phishn@daves

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 25, 2002
Posts
401
Total Time
4900
I'm not sure if I have ever been cleared for an arrival.

I agree with bushpilot on this one, it's all about descent planning. ATC will usually tell you to cross a certain point at a certain altitude (not always what's depicted on the chart).

The Expect altitude is really helpful when you are at 17,000 and need to be at 8000 and you have 10 miles to go and haven't gotten a clearence to descend.
 

gump88

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 28, 2001
Posts
170
Total Time
10000+
As an additional descent planning tool, the "expect altitudes/speeds" are entered into the FMS vertical planning pages on high performance aircraft to present the pilots with realtime vertical flight path information. Once the actual "cross XYZ intersection at 10000/250 knots" has been issued by ATC, the pilots need only to follow the vertical flight path already provided by the FMS/MFD.

What does all that mean??? We can kill more brain cells on our days off!!!! hehe:D

gump
 
Top