Medication for Allergies

Dep676

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I know this topic as been asked before. Is there a website that shows what med's the FAA allows us to take? Or where else I can get a list. I called my AME and the nurse wasn't real sure. I had to tell her that Allegra was allowed. She didn't even know. So any help would be appreciated.
 

bobbysamd

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Medical advice

Do NOT ask your AME. He/she is not your bud, but is the FAA's doctor.

www.leftseat.com is a good medical website.

AOPA gives good, confidential medical advice as well.
 

Dep676

My Glock is bigger!!!!!
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Thanks for the advice. My AME has been pretty helpful so far. It was just the nurse when I called to see if I could take a certain med. She didn't seem to have a clue.
 

Joseph II

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I told my AME (BAAAAD IDEA) that I was taking some alergy medicine. (Flonaise, Allegra, and something else...)

I believe the Flonaise was one that would ground me.. So I told him I took it like once a month if that. When he submitted my application on the computer he wrote that I took them "rarely". My examination passed and I got my medical.

After that experience, I've learned to keep things to yourself. You don't want to lie, but if you can survive without allergy medicine don't take it!

Cheers.
 

Jepp2Jet

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READ and follow label directions for use of medication.
If the label warns of side-effects, do not fly until twice the recommended dosing interval has passed. So, if the label says "take every 4-6 hours," then wait at least 12 hours to fly.
Remember, the condition you are treating may be as disqualifying as the medication.
When in doubt, ask your physician or Aviation Medical Examiner for advice.
As a pilot, you are responsible for your own personal "pre-flight." Be wary of any illness that requires medicine to make you feel better.
If an illness is serious enough to require medication, it is also serious enough to prevent you from flying.
Do not fly if you have a cold - changes in atmospheric pressures with changes in altitude could cause serious ear and sinus problems.
Avoid mixing decongestants and caffeine.
Beware of medications that use alcohol as a base for the ingredients.
http://flysafe.faa.gov/Flysafe/Library/Airman%20Medical%20Info/OTC%20Medicine.htm
 

ILLINI

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DO NOT ask your AME for advice on this sort of stuff! Like bobbysamd said, they are not your pal willing to help you out of a situation. They are basically examiners working with the FAA. If they learn of something that might affect your medical, they can and will inform the FAA about it and possibly have your medical suspended, or even revoked! Yes, there are very nice, friendly, and helpful AMEs out there, but it's not worth the risk of losing your medical to trust them.

If you have any medical questions ask your family physician (as long as he isn't an AME as well), visit leftseat.com or ask AOPA if you are a member. They are not going to rat you out. There was a thread on this board several months ago about a pilot that was being threatned by his personal physician, who just happened to by an AME as well, because of a knee injury or something like that. Like Joseph II said, don't lie, but be carful of what you say around an AME.
 

jackofdiamonds

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allergy med

try using claritanD. I have allergies and it is on the approved list. I have been putting it down on my 1st med. list for the past ten years and have not had a problem with the feds. ( I am a part 121 driver too)
 
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