I would do it in a heartbeat!

Would you land on a freeway?

  • Never

    Votes: 6 3.9%
  • Of couse, big long strip of pavement with no houses or buildings on it

    Votes: 115 75.7%
  • No way to decide, always other factors to consider (This is the cop-out answer)

    Votes: 31 20.4%

  • Total voters
    152

alimaui

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 23, 2002
Posts
207
Total Time
150+
Plane Crashes on Ohio Interstate
Thu May 16,10:02 AM ET

PICKERINGTON, Ohio (AP) - A small plane clipped a light pole and flipped over early Thursday while trying to make an emergency landing on Interstate 70 near this Columbus suburb.


Pilot Bruce Anderson, 51, of Columbus and passenger William Kreuger IV, 22, of Huron crawled out and were not hurt, said state Trooper Virgil Conley, who was in his car watching for speeders and was nearly hit by the plane.

The plane ended up partly on the interstate and partly in the median after the 3:15 a.m. crash.

It apparently had ran out of fuel during the planned flight from Oneida County Airport in New York to Rickenbacker International Airport in Columbus, Conley said.

Conley said he watched the 1976 single-engine Piper Cherokee bank hard between two light poles and above the westbound lanes as it attempted to land on the interstate. It ended up about 50 feet from the trooper.

"At first, I was kind of dumbfounded," Conley said. "Then I realized he was coming right toward me."

Conley said he put his car in reverse but realized he couldn't go on the freeway because of oncoming trucks.

"Basically, I had no where to go," he said. "All options were bad."

The wreckage reduced traffic to one lane on the highway 13 miles east of Columbus during the morning rush hour.

The patrol said the plane would be hauled away on a flatbed truck after it was released by federal investigators.
 

172driver

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 4, 2002
Posts
744
Total Time
4000
How about planning your flight so as to not run out of gas? Flying an altitude giving you more choices than a freeway?
Setting up the glide to not have to hit a pole?
!
 

ILLINI

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
495
Total Time
++++
Correct me if i'm wrong, but isn't that what the Interstate Highway Act during the Eisenhower administration in the 50's design highways for that specific purpose??? Highways were built with long straight aways so military aircraft could use them as emergency landing strips if they needed to. If they could get a large bomber on there, don't see why you couldn't put a Cherokee down as well.
 

wildbill

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
225
Total Time
5000
Illini.
I believe you to be absolutely correct. That was one of the original intentions of the interstate highway system, but somehow engineers have gotten away from the concept. They have cluttered the highways up with camera poles, billboards and other obstacles
 

JediNein

No One Special at all
Joined
Apr 28, 2002
Posts
1,256
Total Time
53 wks
At night it's great! Especially when flying over mountains. In California, the interstates are well lit with the required BLS. Get caught in a downdraft, day or night, and I-5 here I come.

BLS = Buick Lighting System

One just has to know where the powerlines and overpasses are. Another place, will most likely flip the airplane, is the runaway truck ramps. Land @ stall speed to minimize occupant damage.

During rush hours, one is better off landing anywhere but the freeways.:eek:

And the best method is to trust the watch not the indicators, and have enough fuel on board in the first place.

Fly SAFE!
Jedi Nein
 

A Squared

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
3,006
Total Time
11000
Illini, Wildbill,

you have been victim of another Urban Myth, albeit a persistent one.

My father was an engineer who worked on the interstate highway system. I once asked him about this and he just shook his head. Read about the myth debunked here :
http://www.snopes2.com/autos/law/airstrip.htm

regards
 

wildbill

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
225
Total Time
5000
A Squared,
Thanks for the info. Hope that someone from the discovery channel reads this.
 

Timebuilder

Entrepreneur
Joined
Nov 25, 2001
Posts
4,625
Total Time
1634
Rod Machado was the first pilot to tell me about the Buick Lighting System, and sure enough, not long after that, a pilot in our town put that system to use.

After departing Reading and climbing to 5,000 feet, he blew a cylinder on his way to PHL, and landed on 422 near Pottstown. The landing was nearly flawless, considereing an emergency scenario in the dark. He clipped the wing tip on an overpass abundtment, but walked away without a scratch.

I'm told he went right to a hotel to change his boxers...

Rod has the picture to use in his presentations..
 

avbug

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 14, 2001
Posts
7,602
Total Time
n/a
The "cop-out" answer is the correct answer. There are too many variables for a carte blanche reply.
 

alimaui

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 23, 2002
Posts
207
Total Time
150+
avbug said:
The "cop-out" answer is the correct answer. There are too many variables for a carte blanche reply.
Well of course there are other factors. It was just kind of a make you think type of thing. Thinking about it right now, would eliminate one of the first two options? Obviously in an emergency all factors considered there many different scenarios to weigh against each other. For some, however, there are some things that would never be an option.

Ali
 

JediNein

No One Special at all
Joined
Apr 28, 2002
Posts
1,256
Total Time
53 wks
Even if the 1 in 5 is a myth, then why are certain sections of interstate in Penn. extra thick? My dad helped pave several miles on both sides of the state and the construction company and there are sections that long, wide, straight, and heavily reinforced, and those are not where the interstate plowed through former airports (like Indiana).

Imponderable for the night. . .

Fly SAFE!
Jedi Nein
 

Mr. Irrelevant

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
562
Total Time
3000+
Interesting question. My vote was that I'd do it but I've been influenced.

One of my first flight instructors (now flying in the military) was on one of his first flights ever as a teen-ager when the engine quit and his CFI put it down on a major highway. CFI was arrested for lord knows what ridiculous reason, blocking traffic with an airplane maybe???

Second, I spent some time at the Air Force museum out in Dayton last year and had the opportunity to spend the afternoon with a former B-25 pilot and still active CFI(in his 80's). Told me that after the war on a trip to Pennsylvania from Massachusetts he was a little lost so after spying a gas station on a country road down below he brought it around, landed, and taxied up to ask for directions. No problem.

I wouldn't ever land in any of these areas with a good working engine(s) but in an emergency they sound like great places to safely put the plane on the ground as long as one dodges cars, lights, billboards, etc.

Again, nice topic.


Mr. I.
 

aero99

just a member, not senior
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
394
Total Time
10PM
Piper had to land gear up on a highway in Florida a few years back when they were certifying the Meridian. If I remember correctly, they ran out of gas. Guess they found out exactly how much usable fuel is on board for the specs.

There was little damage and Piper ended up selling the plane once it was certified.
 

aggiepilot87

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
120
Total Time
-
172driver said:
How about planning your flight so as to not run out of gas? Flying an altitude giving you more choices than a freeway?
Setting up the glide to not have to hit a pole?
!
Assuming you're not trying to be funny, I'd have to say this is a pretty useless reply. Engines quit, people screw up, pilots make forced landings.

Would I land on an Interstate? You're d@mn right I would - if the conditions were right (cop out answer). If there was a service road along side it, that would be even better. Most of the smaller rural roads have power lines and telephone wires strung across and beside them. Interstates usually don't have as many. Just go with the traffic and set it down. If you can, make a low apch (above the cars), faster than traffic, slowing to land allowing the traffic you just passed over to slow and not run over you. Leave enough ground speed to roll out of the way of traffic.

Another reason to take an Interstate is if you botch the landing, at least someone will probably see you or find you quicker. Smacking a fence line or tree in a field just behind trees or hill alongside the highway doesn't do much for this one.

I just flew a Cub from Idaho to Houston. I never ran out of gas, but I sure followed the roads. This was for a couple of reasons - I didn't want to freeze my @ss off if I had to land in the mountains and spend the night nor did I want to try and dodge the gulleys and rocks landing my new plane.
 

Future SNA

KILL
Joined
May 22, 2002
Posts
244
Total Time
3000+
I-70

I was reading through some old posts, and noticed this one. As for the Eisenhower Interstate myth, I live right next to I-70 in KS, and have flown out of SLN for around 4 years, and can assure you that it's not a myth. Now it may not be for all highways, but I've always been told it was for I-70 ONLY. This is because at the same time they were laying I-70, they were building SLN, formerly Schilling AFB, and they wanted the B-52's based there to have some alternatives. I've been told, by guys flying out of SLN for like 30 years, that for every 10 miles of interstate I-70 in KS, that approximately 2 miles are straight for this very reason. Having flown up and down I-70 on X/C's for around 2 years instructing, I must concur, it seems feasibly based on the miles of highway I've seen.
 

Kaman

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
947
Total Time
8.2
Hello,
Hey they said the same thing about the Eisenhower highway philosphy on a "Cracker Barrel" restaraunt commercial, so it's gotta be true!
Also, this a common occurance in Europe, particularly in Sweden that operates annually from highways with their Viggen fighter. The Swiss, Austrians and RAF, and other countries routinely utilize highways to conduct exercises using remote strips (highways).

Regards,

ex-Navy rotorhead
 

Huck

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 6, 2001
Posts
1,076
Total Time
11,000
The Koreans do it too. I seen 'em.
 

TWA Dude

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
3,666
Total Time
9999+
In Israel as well there are designated sections of highway for emergency airplane use. I think I remember some kind of notation on the WAC charts as well, but my memory might be playing tricks on me.
 

ExAF

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 29, 2001
Posts
647
Total Time
6000
Don't forget the German autobahn system. There are numerous "autobahn landing strips" throughout the country. There are many with barrier housings to allow them to set up cables across the autobahn for arrested landings.
 
Top