I want to be a pilot! Please help!!!

eriknorth

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Hello to all,
I am currently a student at the University of Georgia, but I wish to expand my hobby and possibly career as a pilot. I am looking into getting a transciever and headset. Please, could you tell me what is considered good and bad among pilots? I am looking at the Yaesu Pilot Aviator or Icom transcievers. As far as the headsets go, I have no idea, maybe Telex? Please tell me what my best choices for these items would be, and also any other advice for a new pilot. Thanks yall!
-Clay (eriknorth)
 

aero99

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Before you buy a headset, take a discovery flight. I assume by your note and profile you have zero hours.

Most discovery flights allow one to fly quite a bit to see what it is like. Some schools offer discounts for first timers and you lcould probably go up for an hour for around $35-$55.

Also, most schools will rent you headsets. oNce your hooked and know your going to persue training then go out and spend your cash on a headset.

just a thought.
 

eriknorth

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thanks

Thanks. I do plan on taking that flight asap. But after I get back in my car after the flight and can't stand my money burning a hole in my pocket, what kind of stuff do I get?
 

aero99

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Do a search on "headsets" here on the forum. There are about 15 threads on headsets with different models and cost.

I like David Clark, I think I currently use the 10-30 series. Find one that fits your budget and feels good and seals good. One headset that fits a person well won't fit the next. I have a big head (literally) and the Clarks work well for me. There are less expensive sets like Avcom that work just as well.

For training you should be able to find something very well made and comfortable for under $150.00-185.00.
 
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Flyer7SA

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Take it one step at a time, though. Buy things as you need them, so that you don't overequip yourself right off the bat. Take for example any movie about war. The new guy coming into the platoon is almost always wearing the most stuff, stuff that is great in theory, but that they will never need in actual combat. The battle hardened old timers know that the guy is new and has a long way to go.

In much the same way, I've discovered that it is true in flying as well. There is the classic weekend warrior who comes to the C-172Heavy with full on GPS, backup handheld radio, the latest ANR headsets, plotter, E6B :)eek: ), and the ever popular cloud clearance sight level .

Now, that being said, I'm not discounting the use of GPS or any other useful tool when it gives you an advantage (well, maybe the sight level), but seriously, save your money and ask your instructor what you will need. You may be surprised to find that all that stuff won't amount to much for what you are doing starting out. Buy things as you need them.

Good luck,
Flyer7SA
 

ShawnC

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My suggestion for a begining headset is the AV COMM PNR-900. Its a great headset with the reliabillity of a DC, but it has the same features as a DC but $100 cheaper.

I would not suggest getting ANR (noise canceling) until instrument training, even when you do get it avoid using it below 1000 ft AGL.

A transciever can wait, I would get the stuff that you are going to need first, kneeboard, E6B, plotter etc.
 

dondk

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I agree with everyone... Set your goals one step at a time...

Ask around about headset's, not every headset is for everyone, either in fit, comfort, or pocketbook. Whichever you get, you need to realize this may be the one that you have for year(s).

The aviation industry is one of the worst when it comes to bells and whisltes and gadgets of any type, and before I forget NAME... That is why Sporty's is so rich, and Bose headset's go for $1,000. Try not to fall prey into the gadget's or the bell's and whistle's and hopefully not the name.

Get what you need for now, and what you will need for your private. You will figure out somewhere later on what you really did not need..

Heck, if I could give back all of the gadgets I have sitting in my closet I could probably paid for at least one of my ratings, and I am sure others will agree!
 

bobbysamd

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Pilot "Accessories"

I second Don and everyone about going hogwild on pilot accessories. Over the years, I dropped plenty of good money on pilot gadgets, in particular searching for the perfect kneeboard. I never found one, ever. Every one I tried turned out to be more of a nuisance than a help. It turned out my instructor was right when he told me just to fold the sectional in half and put it on my lap. When I went with students, I used just a good old standard-issue clipboard. It worked just fine. So much for all of the Sporty's doohickies.

I realize these things are sitting there in the FBO pilot shop, virtually screaming out, "Buy Me!" There are so many gadgets that turn out to be so much junk after you buy them and are such a waste of money.

You don't need headsets, yet. Good ones are expensive. Wait until you actually start flying before you spend the money. You don't need a transceiver yet, either, if ever. I remember buying some $15 jobbie at Radio Shack that I used for years to listen to ATIS and ATC. I realize it looks way cool to carry an aeronautical hand-held around. If you feel the need to get something more expensive, purchase a scanner and program it to aircraft frequencies.

Really, do yourself a favor. Spend your money on an intro flight. :)
 
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MartinFierro

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If you still haven't taken that intro flight yet, I'm not sure what the going rate is, but you should visit www.beapilot.com. It offers discounts on those types of flights, and is a good place to familiarize yourself with options out there in flight training. I think it is sponsored by AOPA (Aircraft Owners and Pilots' Association), and a number of FBOs. Good luck to you.
 

herbiside

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HEY AS FAR AS I AM CONCERNED THERE IS NOTHING BETTER THAN DAVID CLARK, IVE HAD MY H10-30S FOR MORE THAN 15 YEARS. THEY STILL WORK JUST AS GOOD NOW IN THE CL-65 AS THEY DID WHEN I TOOK MY FIRST INTRODUCTION FLIGHT IN A C152. ALOT OF THE GUYS I FLY WITH SAY THE SAME.
 

TurboS7

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Here is a real simple way to figure your future in aviation. Let's just plan to go from Miami to Anchorage. Jump in a jet and it will take you 8 to 9 hours. Figure how long it will take you in a train. Next figure how long it will take you to drive. Next figure how long it will take you by boat. For fun figure a bike, and walking, and even a horse. Divide that time into the averge lifetime of 70 years and look at the percentage. Unless someone invents some kind of beaming device, airplanes are here to stay.
 

tarp

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Another vote for one step at a time.

Flight lessons in the Northeast are running about $125/hr. That'll burn a hole in your pocket real fast.

As to accessories - let that wise CFI be your guide.

I tell my private students not to buy a single thing until they have flown three hours. Why? The first lesson is all thrill. The second lesson is a sleep walk where you show up and try to learn. And on the third lesson, you will learn that this is a fun adventure that takes a lot of work. If you show up for a fourth lesson, I'm going to introduce you to a nice Jeppesen Private Pilot Kit. I'm going to give you one of my copies of Sporty's catalog and I'm going to tell you the three options in buying headsets (Short term thinking, long-term thinking and "if you've got money"). Then I'm going to make my boss happy and talk to you about "block time", the needs for charts, a good medical examiner, our ground school, our CD courses, etc, etc. Every thing I suggest will be tailored to you: the student and customer.
 

kilomike

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Tarp hit the nail on the head. One step at a time.

As for headsets I like the David Clarks. Mine have done quite well!

Your instructor will have good insight into what items to buy if you decide that you like flying.

Flying is a great pastime!! Work hard on your training to be the safest pilot you can be and enjoy it all along the way. I'm glad I learned to fly and I always encourage people to learn to fly for pleasure.

Fly safe, eriknorth.

Kilomike
 

Jungle Prop

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I think everyone is in agreement on this subject, take a few lessons first, and make sure you WANT to do this. I have known alot of people who have taken a lesson then had the instructor sell them everything in the FBO's shop and they never came back. If you can put in the time and effort then nothing is as satisfying as earning your pilots wings. As far as headsets, I suggest spending a little more money and getting one that will last you. For the money, David Clarks are by far the best value. A little exspensive, but they'll last you all the way through the regional level.
 

aero99

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Another note is to get your medical exam before you plop down bookoo bucks if you just have to have the toys. GPS, Clarks, handheld things, Jepp bags etc will just collect dust if you can't pass you medical- god forbid.

There was a guy in my class that this happend to. He bought Clarks, hand held gps, and a radio...flew about 15 hours, only to find out he couldn't pass the 3rd class. Never saw the kid again after that.
 

Mickey

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As far as holding off a bit to but things isn't a bad idea. It seems everybody has focused on that a lot and ignored the rest of your question.

As far as headsets go comfort for you is what counts. Do not buy the Bose they seem good at first but break frequently. Several friends have them and they LOVE them but, frequently when I fly with them one of them isn't working. Last night after flying about an hour and a half my head was hurting from them.
David Clark makes a good headset and used to be the only show in town so their prices are high. A lot of people buy the David Clarks because thats what the pros use and that will make them look like one along with their new Ray Ban sun glasses. Well, those days are over. I used to own a David Clark and an AvComm. I sold the David Clark and bought two more AvComms for the same money. For me the AvComms were more comfortable and have held up great.
ANR headsets are great for small planes. I added it to two of my headsets. Noise Cancellation Inc. makes an upgrade unit you can add to your headset at a later date or you can can buy their headset. A friend just bought one of these and a Lightspeed. I'll keep you posted on how he likes each headset.

I have an Icom handeld (IC-A22) and love it. I know of a few people who had problems with Sporty's handheld. Both Yaesu and Icom are well respected names in the radio business. I didn't like the sound quality from the speaker that is in the small Yaesus. I don't know how the sound quality is from the small Icom. If you are only getting it as a back up and will always use a headset adapter then this doesn't matter. In the airplane the headset adapter is a must. As a backup the alkaline pack makes more sense because alkalines store well and don't lose power sitting around like NiCd or NiMh batteries do. I use the NiMh pack for everyday use but I keep an Alkaline pack in the bag for back up.

Good luck with your flying and fly safe. Enjoy.
 

bobbysamd

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Medical

I'll second the comment about getting your medical first. I did NOT do that. I recall seeing the doctor about the same time I started my lessons. I have a condition that required the FAA to issue my initial medical. The AME, who was a good guy, assured me that I would be issued a medical. Nonetheless, aviation was new to me and I had heard horror stories about being denied medicals on the first issuance. I am sure that concern over my medical distracted my concentration. I was living in OKC and was able to pick up my medical personally from the Monroney Center. It took a month to receive it. I recall soloing only a few days later.
 

eriknorth

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Thanks for all your input. Now a couple of followup questions. What exactly does the medical exam consist of and what are common problems that people have that make them not pass it? Also, I keep hearing about "getting your wings." What exactly does this mean and when does it happen? OPne kmore thing...is height a factor in flying? I am 6'5", and have wondered about this. Thanks
-Clay
 
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