high or low:what do you think?

eriknorth

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I'm starting to work on my private in about a month. Should I go with a high wing or a low wing trainer? Its probably going to be either a 172 for the high wing and a 2001 Alarus for the low wing.
 

troy

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My vote, the 172. (or whatever is cheaper to rent)
 

cjh

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A plane's a plane, altough you will probably find you prefer one over the other (I for instance love low wings and hate flying most high wings). Why not try one of each, and see which you like best.
 

flx757

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You ever see a low wing bird??
 

flyboy

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Definitely the high wing. The view is much better. You won't be able to see as much in a low wing. If you plan on making a career out of flying, you'll get your chance in a low wing.
 

trainerjet

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I think high wing airplanes make better trainers, and like flyboy said, if you fly long enough, you will get an opportunity to fly low wing aircraft.
 

Timebuilder

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If I recall, you'll be near HOT'Lanta. The high wing is the plane for you. Easy to fly, forgiving, good glide characteristics, great view, and the cold fuel in the wings (along with the shade) helps keep you cool.

I learned to fly in a cherokee 140 cruiser, with stubby little wings and the landing properties of a brick. I haven't flown the low wing you mentioned, but consider this: when you want to rent an airplane, the 172 is likely to be the plane that's available. Time in type is a big plus, so start now.

Back to trumpet practice. Good luck.
 

navigator72

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I vote for the high wing

I started my flight training in the low wing Traumahawk (What a joke!). I switched to the High wings and have never looked back. Go High!
 

EagleRJ

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High wings are slightly more stable than low wings, so you might actually build your skills faster by learning on a plane that is slightly harder to fly (and I mean slightly- low wing trainers are still very easy to fly). As far as the visibility, they're about the same, except when you are turning in a high wing, you have to momentarily roll in the opposite direction to make sure there aren't any planes there, since the wing will be hiding them.
 

bobbysamd

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High wing v. Low wing

It's six of one, half a dozen of another, in my .02. I did nearly all of my single-engine training in a 172. Did my CFI-A in a Cardinal. Got my high-performance (complex) signoff in an Arrow. Trained students in both high and low wing.

Whatever you like better. You may get more real-world type training in low wing, because you have to learn how to manage fuel and operate electric fuel pumps. You don't do that in a 172. I liked Piper because they were friendlier in crosswinds than Cessna.
 

ShawnC

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Remember what makes an airplane fly... money. Choose the one that takes the least of it.

As far as a preferance, I have none, a plane really is a plane, but if you can train in a bi-plane or a tail wheel, well thats a diffrent story. Other than that take the route that will take the least of your money.
 

Otto

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Low Wing!

Somebody mentioned you would be training in Atlanta...is that true? I started my training there out of PDK...first few flight were in a C-172 but I later switched to a PA-28 (Piper Cherokee) as I found the visibility was a lot better when making turns. Would you rather have a good view of the ground, thousands of feet below you, or of planes in the air that you could smack into? That's what I thought. That's just my take but I think it's something to consider. Atlanta's airspace is VERY busy. Good Luck!
 

RJFlyer

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I started out in a Cherokee 140, which I loved - then somebody crashed it. Finished my private in a Cessna 152 - it was ok, but I didn't like it as much. A student will be spending a lot of time in the traffic pattern, and for this the low wing is MUCH better. When turning, I like to be able to see what's over there. If you can find a place that has Grumman trainers, check them out. They're not as forgiving as a Cherokee or Cessna (meaning if you can fly it, you can definitely fly the others), faster, and you can slide the canopy back on hot days - even in flight! - and you look a lot cooler taxiing around with your arm hanging out. They've been called the 'poor man's warbird.'
 

aero99

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Use both! The low and high wing trainers and pretty much the same. Slight pros and cons depending on who you ask and where, why they fly. I used both during my private and I think it gave me a better understanding of flight itself. I wouldn't swap every other flight but have your instructor give you some dual in both planes so once you do get your private you will have some experience and your own likes, dislikes.
 

Acestick

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Whenever it comes down to a Cessna -vs.- anything short of a Learjet, go with the Cessna
 
T

TDTURBO

As you can see I own a 182RG and I would much rather fly a low wing. They are much easier to fly and can handle much more crosswind (PA-28's). The 182 is a great stable IFR platform, but for initial training, I would go with an Archer or something close. The first thing you'll notice with a Piper is the quality of the appointments inside, a cessna looks and feels 2nd rate inside (cheap). Also, someone made a comment about the favorable glide characteristics of a high wing, while they, (Cessna's), glide Ok, a PA-28-161 will outglide a 172 by 15%.......check the POH of both planes and compare. If I had a scanner handy I would show you. The Pipers are also quieter. I still would take my 182 over an Arrow anyday, or a Saratoga for that matter, but for training, I like the Pipers.
 
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Chas

My opinion

The 172 seems like a big windsock to me , the 152 is great in cross winds but cramped the pa 28 seemed more stable as you sit on the wing and it handles well in a cross wind .The emergency brake style wing flaps was kinda weird on the pa 28 but they work well try em all out and get your feel dfor the plane Chas
 
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