Eye Preservation/Tribal Knowledge

SMan

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Dec 6, 2001
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Since a pilot's eyes are his career, I was wondering if there was any tribal knowledge out there on how to keep you eyes in tip-top shape? Any specific vitamins, foods, methods, web sites with info, etc, etc....? I have 20/20 now, but I spend a lot of time reading and working in front of a computer so I'm a little nervous that my eyes may deteriorate.... Any help would be appreciated!

Thx,
SMan
 

Purple Haze

Out there and lovin' it
Joined
Nov 25, 2001
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>6000
40 years old, read a lot, internet junkie, fly a lot.
I always wear 100% UV bocking shades in the sun.

Vision still hanging on at 20/15 (barely).
Don't smoke
Everything in moderation (work hard/play hard is overrated)
Sleep when you are tired
Eat your veggies

(I think it is genetic -- just hope for the best!):cool:
 

Michael Knight

helping the innocent
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I've been reading / studying the book, "The Bates Method for Better Eyesight without Glasses" by William H. Bates, M.D.. The Author is dead, the original publication was 1943. I believe the original work was set out to help those with poor vision and challenges the age old method of throwing glasses on all eye problems. From the reading I get the feeling that much of his work had opposition from the mainstream glass and contact pushers. So, you will probably run into some naysayers about it.

Anyway, I heard about the book on an earlier thread (about 5 months ago) and wanted to read it for myself. I'm sure you can search this site for that thread. The book cost me about $8 including shipping. The book is very dry reading at times as it gets into all the eye parts and detailed research. It eventually gets to the good parts of treatment and good eye health. Interestingly you learn how more sleep does not necessarily help your eyesight, lots of reading also isn't bad and a bunch of other interesting things (mixed in with research stuff). It goes on to talk how your vision is more dependent on your mind than the actual eyeball and he uses examples of how those with bad vision had great improvements in a short period of time. It appeared the younger patients made quicker progress. There was a person that went from 3/200 to 20/10 (not by reading his book but by actual treatment). I know... sounds far fetched. I don't know for certain since I wasn't born when this book was written but the book is still an eye-opener (pun free of charge). Besides, everyone thought the world was flat at one time.

I am interested in reading some of the newer books based on his method; hopefully newer works will be easier reads.

If you look up this title or use keywords Bates and Eyesight on Amazon you will find several books. The Bates' method has spawned many newer treatments / exercises to improve and keep vision. You can look at the reviews on Amazon to pick one that suits you. The even have a few works out in Audio and video tape.

His techniques and exercises appear to be effective with my limited exposure. I have very good vision so I'm not claiming any great vision improvement. It is simply hard to explain but maybe by reading some reviews of books on Amazon or elsewhere you can figure out if you want to learn more. If I were someone that wanted to lose my glasses... I'd definitely check it out!

I'd be interested to hear what others that have read this or other works on the Bates' method think. Any other recommendations?

I'm also in the market for some good sunglasses but I really wonder how much better protection name brand glasses give over less expensive brands. I mean, Maui Jims do look better on me than my foster grants but is there really any difference in protection?

Here's to good eye health!
Mike
 

bobbysamd

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Dr. Bates

An old United DC-10 Captain recommended the book to me. He said he was told when he was just out of college that he needed glasses. He told me he got the book, practiced the exercises, and never needed glasses. It's probably true; when I met this gentleman he was not wearing glasses!

It was too late for me; I've been wearing glasses and/or contacts since third grade. Just the same, I tried a couple of his exercises, such as the one where you go into a dark room and/or cover your eyes for blackness so they relax, and I thought I detected a little improvement.

You know, for less than $15, the book is worth a try, if the exercises can potentially improve your vision.
 

Drifter

Coming to a town near you
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Mar 27, 2002
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plenty
I'm not sure about the Bates Method but I was wondering if anybody knows about OrthoKeratology (Ortho-K)? Does this really work? Does anybody have any experience with this? Maybe this is one way to slow down or reverse eyesight deterioration. Here's a link.
http://www.ortho-k.net/orthok.htm
The Drifter
 

KlingonLRDRVR

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Went to law school with 20/15 came out with 20/30. My eye Doc told me that it was from continous reading up close without looking up every 10 to 15 minutes to look across the room and focus on something far away for one minute. I wish I would have know this going into school. In retrospect I should have got up every 15 minutes and got another beer, my grades would have been alot better. Cheers.

KlingonLRDRVR
 

bobbysamd

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Ortho-K

Reading law will kill your vision, alright. I've found it to be true; my wife, who is a law librarian, has had her glasses changed something like three times in the six years we've been married.

At any rate, ortho-k has been around for years. It involves working with a series of contact lenses that reshape your corneas. I understand that it only produces a temporary cure; eventually, your corneas spring back to their original shape, as does your pre ortho-k vision.

I recall hearing that ortho-k was popular among Delta hopefuls years ago. Delta required applicants to have 20/20 or better as of their date of hire. so these folks used the contacts to improve their vision. After they were hired, they dispensed with the contacts. I recall seeing plenty of Delta pilots who wore glasses.

Somehow, it seems that if you get adequate rest and avoid computer screens and TV that your vision should remain intact. People used to say that you should avoid going to the movies as well. I recall needing several glasses changes until my late teens or early twenties. Then, my vision didn't change until my early to mid 40s. By that time I was wearing contacts but needed reading glasses. Most everyone needs reading glasses eventually. It's all part of the aging process. Heredity may also have to do with it. My father wore glasses since he was a child and my aunts and uncles on his side all wore Coke-bottle lens glasses.

Hope that helps a little.
 
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Michael Knight

helping the innocent
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bobby,

It is good to see inputs from all points of view. With that said, your last post contradicts much of what Dr. Bates puts out after years of research. That being your analogy to age and disfunction.

I'm not saying there is an easy way nor am I saying your experiences are less than what they were. Still, rest and avoiding computer screens is a somewhat futile attempt to improve or sustain vision.

I don't agree it is part of the aging process, thankfully. For those that do... good luck with your glasses!
 

bobbysamd

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Vision

Basically, what I have observed (sorry) about vision is anecdotal among people I know or have known, especially those who use computers. Something about the CRT and unnoticed flickering in it wreaks havoc with vision. Some principle with TV. Also, florescent lighting is hard on vision for the same principle. Unless you rest your eyes and take care of them, your vision deteriorates.

If you've learned about baseball, one of the greatest right-handed hitters of all time, Rogers Hornsby, refused to go to movies. He believed the flickering from the screen was bad for vision. It's understandable to see where he was coming from, given the flickering screens of the '20s.

Don't forget, Dr. Bates' research was done before before TV or computers, so it's almost an apples-and-oranges comparison. I read the book. Once again, the exercises are worth trying. They apparently worked for the old United captain who told me about the book. But, you apparently have to start with them early. As I said above, they really didn't help me because I was too far gone.
 
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