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Delta off the runway again

Freight Dawg

What can Brown do for you
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Enough
Could they have an anti-skid failure on one side, or both?
 

SWA Bubba

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Delta and southwest, setting records!
And there's Maru, as usual, adding absolutely nothing to any conversation. Hey, don't you have a picket line to cross or something?

Bubba
 

SoberIrishman

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Very lucky! Aircraft mounted the embankment between two sets of large overflow pipes from the bay, and took out several hundred feet of fence. If it had hit those pipes I am sure there would have been a fireball and many injuries or worse. Very fortunate.
 

Tripower455

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Lots..
Ya, man. Your right. They must be fools. I'm sure they had lots of fun.

I wonder what that scene looked like when both of those pilots (or anyone else directly involved with this scary event) got home and hugged their loved ones.

But for the grace of God go I.

Just a word of wisdom for you. Step back and think before you speak. It's a small community and anyone of us could be affected by something like this on any given day.
Amen......

I guess I shouldn't be, but I am truly shocked at the way so called "professionals" throw rocks at each other when this stuff happens.

Every one of us is one bad day away from being on CNN. Act accordingly.

If you think that this kind of stuff can never happen to you, then you should not be flying airplanes.
 

realityman

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You jackholes (you know who you are) talkin smack after an incident just sink this profession further into the busdriver category the public wants to believe. Nothing, REPEAT, NOTHING has been released about what happened factaully and you monkeys got it solved here on FI.....

Sad
Dead on.

I'm amazed at all the folks who are supposedly the "cream of the crop", the ones who have "made it" by becoming pilots at the majors, can act so unprofessionally, even on FI.

Very sad to read some of the comments from "professional" aviators on here.
 

realityman

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Amen......

I guess I shouldn't be, but I am truly shocked at the way so called "professionals" throw rocks at each other when this stuff happens.

Every one of us is one bad day away from being on CNN. Act accordingly.

If you think that this kind of stuff can never happen to you, then you should not be flying airplanes.
Yep.

All those on here who claim they always act "professionally" when operating their aircraft, and by implication, that this could never happen to them, especially when there are currently ZERO facts available to explain what happened, truly bring this profession down.

Sometimes bad things happen. Mechanical issues. Weather. And even the very best among us will fins him/herself making bad judgement calls from time to time. The difference between the pilots of that Delta flight and those on here cutting them down is simply one of bad consequences for the mechanical/weather/decisions this time.

Most of us will slip through unscathed when bad things happen. Even bad decisions. But at some point, it'll catch up with us. It always does. Hopefully not in a big public way as with this event, but one way or another we'll all feel the sting.

My best wishes for that crew.
 

Noserider76

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Amen......

I guess I shouldn't be, but I am truly shocked at the way so called "professionals" throw rocks at each other when this stuff happens.

Every one of us is one bad day away from being on CNN. Act accordingly.

If you think that this kind of stuff can never happen to you, then you should not be flying airplanes.
It's not the professionals that make those comments. It's the wannabe tools who have been tools most of their lives that do it. Some of them somehow have slipped past the hiring departments.
 

jonjuan

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It's not the professionals that make those comments. It's the wannabe tools who have been tools most of their lives that do it. Some of them somehow have slipped past the hiring departments.
Tanker is a CA at SWA, btw.
 

flyboyike

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That airport has many risk factors on the best of days. There's only one good thing about LGA, and that's the buffet on C concourse!
I agree. One of the biggest risk factors with landing on 13 is that it's hardly ever done. In my eight years with three airlines, I landed on it exactly twice.
 

Data

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Dead on.

I'm amazed at all the folks who are supposedly the "cream of the crop", the ones who have "made it" by becoming pilots at the majors, can act so unprofessionally, even on FI.

Very sad to read some of the comments from "professional" aviators on here.
That all ended on or about GL's 5000th post, we're way past that stuff. You need to look no further than GL for the reason this site is what it is today ("cream of the crop", "unprofessional" etc). Speaking of, where is that dillweed?
 

Erlanger

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NTSB report today of findings so far.

I highlighted some significant things here. Could they have landed too smoothly or hydroplaned and neither the spoilers or brakes activated because of it? And for those of you that have started to blame the crew...STFU!

March 9, 2015
WASHINGTON - As part of its ongoing investigation into last week?s accident at LaGuardia Airport where Delta Air Lines flight 1086 veered off the runway shortly after touching down, the NTSB today released its second investigative update.
On Thursday, March 5, 2015 at approximately 11:18 A.M., Delta flight 1086, a Boeing MD-88 flying from Atlanta, GA to LaGuardia, NY exited the runway and came to rest with its nose on an embankment. There were 127 passengers (including 2 lap children) and 5 crewmembers on board the flight. Twenty three passengers received minor injuries, and others were transported to the hospital for evaluation. All passengers have been released from the hospital.
Since arriving on scene, the NTSB, with assistance from the FBI, has documented the runway markings and the airplane. Investigators have determined:
? The airplane departed the left side of runway 13 about 3,000 feet from the approach end of the runway. The tracks were on a heading of about 10 degrees from the runway heading.
? About 4,100 feet from the approach end of the runway, the airplanes left wing initially struck the airport?s perimeter fence, which is located on top of the berm, and the airplane tracks turn back parallel with runway 13.
? About 5,000 feet from the approach end of the runway, the airplane came to rest with its nose over the berm,. The left wing of the airplane destroyed about 940 feet of the perimeter fence.
? Significant damage to the airplane was noted, including:
o Damage on the left wing?s leading edge slats, trailing edge flaps, and flight spoilers.
o The breach of the left wing fuel tank was noted in the area of the outboard end of the outboard trailing edge flap.
o Damage to the front radome, weather radar and to the underside of the fuselage from the front of the airplane all the way back to the area of the left front passenger door.
o Damage was also noted in the nose landing gear well and main electronics bay.
? The tailcone handle in the main cabin was actuated.
? The autobrake selector switch in the cockpit was found in the ?max? position.
As part of the investigative process, the following investigative groups have been formed: Operations and Human Performance, Airworthiness, Airports, Flight Data Recorder, Cockpit Voice Recorder, and Maintenance Records. Below is a summary of some their work, to date.
? The Maintenance Records group began reviewing the maintenance records on Saturday and that work is ongoing.
o Delta Air Lines is the original owner of the accident airplane and took delivery of it on December 30, 1987.
o The aircraft had 71,195.54 flight hours and 54,865 flight cycles at the time of the accident.
o The last major maintenance visit took place on September 22, 2014 in Jacksonville, Fla. This visit was part of the airplane?s regularly scheduled maintenance program, and included tests of the auto brake, antiskid and auto spoiler systems.
o The last overnight service check was completed March 2, 2015 in Tampa, Fla.
? Investigators with the Airworthiness group will continue to examine and test the antiskid, autobrake and thrust reverser systems today.
? The Operations and Human Performance groups interviewed the flight crew on Saturday in Atlanta, Ga. The crew stated:
o They based their decision to land on braking action reports of "good," which they received from air traffic control.
o That the runway appeared all white when they broke out of the overcast, moments before landing.
o That the automatic spoilers did not deploy but that the first officer quickly deployed them manually.
o That the auto brakes were set to ?max? but that they did not sense any wheel brake deceleration.

o The captain reported that he was unable to prevent the airplane from drifting left.
? An NTSB air traffic control specialist has gather the following information: another Delta Air Lines MD-88 airplane landed on runway 13 about 3 minutes prior to flight 1086 (the FDR has been sent to the NTSB recorder lab and investigators will interview this flight crew in the coming days) and confirmed that air traffic controllers relayed the braking action reports to the flight crew of 1086,which were based on pilot reports from two other flights that landed several minutes prior to flight 1086. Both earlier flights reported the breaking action on the runway as ?good?.
? A preliminary readout of the Flight Data Recorder found:
o That the autopilot was engaged until the airplane was about 230 feet above the ground.
o That the airspeed during the final approach was about 140 knots and touchdown occurred at about 133 knots.
o That the airplane?s heading deviated to the left and it departed the runway shortly after touchdown.
o That there are degradations in recorded signal quality around the time the airplane departed the runway and extraction and verification of the data is continuing.
? The quick access data recorder on flight 1086 was also recovered and that recorder is being readout at NTSB headquarters today.
? An NTSB meteorologist is examining the weather conditions at the time of the accident.
? The Cockpit Voice Recorder group plans on convening at NTSB headquarters Tuesday, to begin developing the CVR transcript.
 

75 Driver

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The Boat(LGA) was not turned into the wind

So basically the crew ground looped an MD at the 3000 ft point down the runway.

OUTSTANDING
 
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400ADude

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Kick ass! News to me.

Hate to keep this discussion on track, but have we heard back on the toxicology report yet?
Very interesting indeed to find out. I'm guessing the BAC over under for both will be .18. I'm bettin under.
 

Scoot 11

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Very interesting indeed to find out. I'm guessing the BAC over under for both will be .18. I'm bettin under.
You need a brain to guess, ahole!
The only thing you're under is tanker clown's crotch!
 

GlorifiedCabbie

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Flew commuters in the '80s and knew that when landing on 13, once you passed the intersection of 4/22 and R, the standing water would cause the A/C to hydroplane. Used to land wing low as opposed to landing with a crab. Common knowledge for the day.
 
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