Best way to get CFI

Brokepilot

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Nov 27, 2001
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Is it better to go to a formal ground school or one-on-one with an instructor. There are schools that do it either way or combine the two. I have talked to several schools and they are always trying to sell you on the way that they do the training as being the best. Any suggestions? I am doing this on a limited budget if that makes any difference.

Also, once I do get my CFI, what about my CFII and MEI. I have heard a few pilots say that the best way to do this is to do your MEI and CFII rides at the same time. How important is it to have a CFII and/or MEI?

Thanks,
Brokepilot
 

A1FlyBoy

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Jan 11, 2002
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Enough
What are your requirements? Do you learn well in a group setting or do you excell and want one on one training? Money matters and will narrow the options.

All schools think they offer the "best" training for the dollar. You need to consider what your needs are and find the school that is offering training similiar to what you want.

Consider the source ( the school ) they are in business to make money. Think about why they are doing things the way they do. Ask for names and numbers of graduates, see how they liked the training... any good school should have their CFI graduates working at their school.. if they're not, HMMMMM

Ask 40 questions... its your time and your money. Visit the school, hang out there... even before you decide to train there.. see what goes on.If they brush questions off or don't return calls promptly, move on.

If you can tailor a MEI CFII ride, all the better.
 

Ned

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Dec 3, 2001
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If you are Broke

If you are broke.... I'd suggest the route I took which will get you a CFI for less than $500.00

First get a free copy off the PTS for a CFI off the faa's web site. Then go to the list of advisory circular's and get all of them that you can for free off the faa website. Order those that you have to from the government printing office or a thrid party.

Then read all of those books and circulars. Then read all of the regulations that apply to private, commercial, recreational, and instructor pilots as well as the sections in the AIM that apply. There is a list of those regs in ASA and gleim books. I'd also suggest reading the practical test guide by gleim. I'd guess all that reading material will cost you less than $150.00

I needed about 4 flights to go over private and commercial maneuvers, and only 4 as I had read, studied, written step by step instructions for each maneuver, before getting in the plane... get the idea?

Then go take your FREE checkride with the FSDO (you do have to pay for the plane)

Like I said, I came in under $500.00 for the whole thing. But it required a lot of reading on my own time.
 

bobbysamd

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CFI training

Of course, every school offers the best training possible. And, of course, every school claims it is the only way to the airlines. The answer to your question is, well, a lot depends. You want to be careful not to be penny-wise and pound-foolish, because you'll end up paying (through the nose) in the long run.

I did all my studying at home. I don't feel that I learned it as well had I gone to class, studied, prepared assignments, taken notes and interacted with the instructor and class. I saw the difference. I went to class for instrument and CFI-I (weekend class) and ATP and FEX (weekend class). I got a great deal out of those learning situations.

The airplane time you need may well depend on (1) how well you are now flying the airwork and (2) how quickly you can learn to fly out of the right seat. Most of the flying is the same, but landings are strange at first out of the right seat. Bottom line about the flying is each CFI is a single-engine airplane, instrument rating, and multi rating ride(s) out of the right seat. If you can pick up flying from the right seat quickly and fly it all to standards, you may well have the same experience as Ned. Most CFI students I had needed the full 10 or 15 hours of course time to hone their maneuvers from the right seat.

It is more than important for you to have all three airplane ratings, so you are completely qualified to instruct everything. I do like the idea of earning Commercial and Instrument in the multi and then jumping into the right seat of the multi to earn intial CFI as an MEI and CFII. You can really maximize the value of your (expensive) multi time that way. Morever, the information will be fresh in your mind. You can always pick up airplane CFI later and do it in a fixed-gear.

Finally, it may well be luck of the draw if you get FSDO to give you your practical. Depending on the FSDO, it could well send you to a DE and you'll have to pay. Opinion seems to be split as to whether a DE gives an easier or better ride versus FSDO.

Hope these thoughts help. Good luck with your plans.
 
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