Another IFR question

C172Heavy

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I have a question about clearances related to radar vectors.

I was flying approaches a couple of days ago and was cleared to my second airport for an approach via radar vectors. Sitting there I was thinking about the 'what if' scenarios. After receiving my first vector for the airport what route do I fly assuming I lost comms after that first vector. Assuming no GPS, do I fly to and IAF for whatever approach I want to fly at that airport. Squaking 7600 will alert the controller, but I was just wondering what, if any regs, apply to this.

Thanks.
 

flydog

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If you are cleared to a specific approach via radar vectors you fly that approach. You didnt specify wether you were cleared to the IAF, the airport or another fix so this is assuming you were given something like "fly heading 340 for the ILS 27 at xxx airport"
 

C172Heavy

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Actually in this instance I was in the process of flying three approaches at three different airports. On the way to the first apt, I gave the controller my requests for all three approaches. Then during the first missed approach he gave me radar vectors for the second approach (the one I was talking about in the first post). He only cleared me to the airport, he never gave me an approach clearance.

So I am assuming I would fly the approach that I requested since that is probably what the controller would be assuming I would do. Therefore, I am assuming I should just fly direct to one of the IAF's and execute the approach I requested.
 

bobbysamd

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Lost Comm

Yeah, I think I would squawk the 7700 for one minute and then 7600 and fly to the IAF and execute the approach as published. Of course, I'd be aware of the MSAs, MEAs, MOCAs, etc.
 

PHX767

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Now you just go straight to 7600 - that changed a while back. (AIM 6-4-2 a ).

The controller has to give you the "expected routing" part of the equation. I.E; "Turn to 270, expect the ILS 9L". That way when you lose comm, you at least know what they are expecting you to do.
 

FlyinBrian

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Reference 91.185. I think this is one of the few regulations that isn't really that difficult to understand.
 

walkthasky

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some
IFR COMM LOSS

READ THIS!!!!!!!!!


Sec. 91.185

IFR operations: Two-way radio communications failure.

(a) General. Unless otherwise authorized by ATC, each pilot who has two-way radio communications failure when operating under IFR shall comply with the rules of this section.
(b) VFR conditions. If the failure occurs in VFR conditions, or if VFR conditions are encountered after the failure, each pilot shall continue the flight under VFR and land as soon as practicable.
(c) IFR conditions. If the failure occurs in IFR conditions, or if paragraph (b) of this section cannot be complied with, each pilot shall continue the flight according to the following:
(1) Route.
(i) By the route assigned in the last ATC clearance received;
(ii) If being radar vectored, by the direct route from the point of radio failure to the fix, route, or airway specified in the vector clearance;
(iii) In the absence of an assigned route, by the route that ATC has advised may be expected in a further clearance; or
(iv) In the absence of an assigned route or a route that ATC has advised may be expected in a further clearance, by the route filed in the flight plan.
(2) Altitude. At the highest of the following altitudes or flight levels for the route segment being flown:
(i) The altitude or flight level assigned in the last ATC clearance received;
(ii) The minimum altitude (converted, if appropriate, to minimum flight level as prescribed in Sec. 91.121(c)) for IFR operations; or
(iii) The altitude or flight level ATC has advised may be expected in a further clearance.
(3) Leave clearance limit.
(i) When the clearance limit is a fix from which an approach begins, commence descent or descent and approach as close as possible to the expect-further-clearance time if one has been received, or if one has not been received, as close as possible to the estimated time of arrival as calculated from the filed or amended (with ATC) estimated time en route.
(ii) If the clearance limit is not a fix from which an approach begins, leave the clearance limit at the expect-further-clearance time if one has been received, or if none has been received, upon arrival over the clearance limit, and proceed to a fix from which an approach begins and commence descent or descent and approach as close as possible to the estimated time of
arrival as calculated from the filed or amended (with ATC) estimated time en route.

:D
 
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