Another airport security "sell out"

e120flier

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Taken with a grain of salt because I just saw it on the news:
Apparently now if you show a Delta Crown Room card or an American Admiral card, you too can now be allowed past security without a ticket (at least at ATL). Gee, I wonder who pushed this idea, couldn't be the AIRLINES!! (you know the same folks that pushed for NO guns in the cockpit). Ahhh the power of the almighty $$ Anyway, why should I care? Those pesky terrorists would never be smart enough to utilize another security loophole.
 
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Wiggums

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I'm still unsure as to how only allowing ticketed passengers past the gates increases security. I seem to remember that all the 9/11 terrorists had tickets.
 

ShawnC

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All it prevents is to make it more uncomfortable for the traveling public to fly. Instead of your party waiting for you at the gate, you have to search for them among hundreds of people at the area just past the metal detectors.

If they are all screened the same I don't see how letting everyone go though would improve security. Then again we could just let our CIA loose to preform more human intellegence and thus would be able to more effectively predict when and where the attacks would come.

Then again for me there would be no convience my family is usually driving thier car up and down the arrivals area, it gets a little hard for me to hop on a moving car. For some reason as I run to catch up they seem to speed up.
 

tdvalve

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"I'm still unsure as to how only allowing ticketed passengers past the gates increases security. I seem to remember that all the 9/11 terrorists had tickets."

Has nothing to do with increasing security. Has to do with long lines at security scanning points.
 

e120flier

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It also has something to do with the practice of easing security in a time when we are supposed to be closing as many of the loopholes as possible. Sure this is a minor change, but it illustrates the mindset that the companies practice by allowing the public to "feel secure". So the companies say: OK, now that we've got a couple of months under our belts and nothing has happened, do we really need to continue to follow all the programs we planned to or are we safe to revert back to the practice of "cosmetic security"?
I would like to see the major security issues dealt with, like cargo. Are we going to see companies fix the system, ease where they can, or are we going to see them deal with it after the next attack? And then do just enough to get by... again?
 
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