An ATP giving instruction

C90Guy

Member
Joined
Nov 28, 2001
Posts
9
Total Time
2700
I recently recieved my ATP. I took the check ride in a C90B at flight Safety. I have been told because of this I can give instruction in my airplane even though I am not a CFI. Can some one please tell me witch FAR this refers to and point out the specifics. Is it multi instruction or just instruction on the aircraft systems. Does the person need to be multi rated or can the same instruction be given to a private pilot? Thanks.
 

Draginass

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 29, 2001
Posts
1,852
Total Time
5000+
It's my understanding that you can only instruct if you are working for a Part 121 company, and then only with it's direction and supervision.
 

avbug

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 14, 2001
Posts
7,602
Total Time
n/a
An ATP may instruct other pilots in air transport service, without holding a flight instructor certificate. I can't quote the FAR reference right now, as I'm sitting out of town without my books and database. However, in order to qualify to provide this instruction, both the ATP, and the recipient of the instruction must be involved in a training program under FAR 121 or 135, approved by the certificate holder. This is not intended to be instruction toward any certificate or rating, other than specific certification received as required by the certificate holder.

One may not simply instruct other pilots because one holds an ATP certificate. You may instruct others in your company, if approved and designated by your company. Outside of that, your hands are tied.
 

bin LAAidoff

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 11, 2001
Posts
54
Total Time
7000
per FAR's, as an ATP you can give "instruction in Air Transport Service". What is that? Not sure I exactly know myself....It is one of the famous grey areas in the FAR's.

You may not give instruction required for a part 61 rating. i.e. the 15 hours dual required for instrument rating, or 20 hours dual for private etc....Can you sign off someone for a multi rating? NO. Can you instruct them in Air Transportation? I think so, but I'm not sure what you teach them....

My theory (and CW) is that the ATP "instruction in air transportation" was meant as relief provided in mind of 121/135 operators to allow a person to be a Check Airman, and provide instruction without having to become a CFI. If you think about it, it would be ridiculous-- why should a captain who can teach volumes, and is a great teacher, be banned from becoming a check airman because he/she never was a CFI? However, I've never seen anything in print indicating "instruction in air transportation" is limited to 121/135 under an approved program.

Similar comparision-- At my flying club, from time to time, Non-CFI's have conducted "checkouts" some of them doing a far better job than any club CFI (time in type etc.). This is perfectly legal, though Conventional Wisdom indicates this is usually a CFI function. A checkout is usually an insurance or company/club formality. Depends if policy specifies CFI/Dual etc. A post accident lawsuit may question the grey area however.

As usual, I meant to put in my 2 cents, but ended up with 5.99
 

RueterF16

Active member
Joined
Nov 29, 2001
Posts
40
Total Time
3500
Here are the regs from the FAA site. Basically you can instruct in any aircraft that you are typed and rated in and only in the field of Air Transportation Service. What does this mean? It means that as an ATP it gives your company the option of making you a ground or flight instructor for the purposes of IOE, Initial qual, upgrades etc. You can't use these privileges to go out and instruct someone for their checkride in a C-172.


§ 61.167 Privileges.

(a) A person who holds an airline transport pilot certificate is entitled to the same privileges as those afforded a person who holds a commercial pilot certificate with an instrument rating.

(b) An airline transport pilot may instruct --

(1) Other pilots in air transportation service

(Air transportation means interstate, overseas, or foreign air transportation or the transportation of mail by aircraft. )

in aircraft of the category, class, and type, as applicable, for which the airline transport pilot is rated and endorse the logbook or other training record of the person to whom training has been given;

(2) In flight simulators, and flight training devices representing the aircraft referenced in paragraph (b)(1) of this section, when instructing under the provisions of this section and endorse the logbook or other training record of the person to whom training has been given;

(3) Only as provided in this section, unless the airline transport pilot also holds a flight instructor certificate, in which case the holder may exercise the instructor privileges of subpart H of part 61 for which he or she is rated; and

(4) In an aircraft, only if the aircraft has functioning dual controls, when instructing under the provisions of this section.

(c) Excluding briefings and debriefings, an airline transport pilot may not instruct in aircraft, flight simulators, and flight training devices under this section --

(1) For more than 8 hours in any 24-consecutive-hour period; or

(2) For more than 36 hours in any 7-consecutive-day period.

(d) An airline transport pilot may not instruct in Category II or Category III operations unless he or she has been trained and successfully tested under Category II or Category III operations, as applicable.

[Doc. No. 25910, 62 FR 16298, Apr. 4, 1997; Amdt. 61-103, 62 FR 40907, July 30, 1997]
 
Top