allatps in atlanta?

macatstarr

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I was wondering if anyone had any feedback on the acclerated career pilot course that ALLATPS advertises? 3 months from pvt. to MEII seems very fast. I was wondering if its worth the 31K?, And if they hire you as an instructor when your done. thanks
 

Flyer7SA

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Ask yourself

I just did my Commercial Multi Instrument there. I like the instructors in Atlanta, personally. Shane, Wes, Jim and Brian are all very nice guys. However, ask yourself if you really want to spend the money and be 30 grand in debt in three months without a CFI job? Rather, if you can go slower and eek out your ratings piece meal without dropping your life and your livelyhood, but also at a reasonable pace, you could position yourself to have your ratings when things start to pick up.

At this point in time with the way things are, this is a very tough question to consider. A year ago, this was not the case.

Good luck,
Flyer7SA
 

skydiverdriver

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I would do it. I worked for ATP Inc for a short time, and I think they do a good job. My ratings were gained over a very long period, over ten years. I did that because of the cost, as I didn't want to go into so much debt. So, because of that, I missed out on years of airline senority, and I figured I wasted about 20 grand over what it would have cost me in a quicker program. Be assured that hiring will come back, and even Comair's Academy just purchased a bunch of Seminoles.

If you become a CFI right away, you will start gaining hours, which will get you ready for the next hiring swing. Don't be left behind. Just a suggestion. Good luck to you.
 

IFLYASA

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I went throught the 3 month course in Atlanta and instructed there once I was finished. It's by bar the best bang for the buck. If you want to fly 121, seniority is everything. Get those ratings and hours as fast as you can. Expect to fly 7 days a week. There will be days when the weather does not permit. Use these to study. The apartments are 5 minutes from the airport. I wouldn't recommend JAX for the fact the boss man looks over your shoulder. ATL has a little more freedom.

Good luck!
 

flyboy

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i'm interested in their cfi programs. they have a deal right now but it is changing next month. they currently have a $3559 deal. does anyone happen to know what the new price will be?
 

Data

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ATL ATPS

I just went through Atlanta as well. Personally, I don't think you can go wrong with this program. ATP doesn't hold your hand in the training, but they do give you plenty of opportunity to get through this and come out with the knowledge and experience you need.

I've talked with a few former ATP students that are now flying at the regional level, most of them say that if you can get through this then you will be able to get through your initial training with just about any regional carrier. That is the big difference between this program and others, call it drinking from a fire hose if you want, I tend to look at it as being a little more realistic in simulating what your first 121 job is like.

As for the flying, that is where it really matters most, and this program will gives you plenty of that. The best part is the cross country phase, I learned more in my first 5 days flying with my partner than I did in just about any other part of the program. There aren't many other schools that put you through this kind of cross country flying.

And finally, as for hiring you as an instructor, ATP only hires from the Career Pilot pool. Remember, though, that your time in the program is your interview, complain all the time to dispatch and forget about instructing (this includes asking for one of the new planes (Alpha Tangos) on every trip). If you go into this fully prepared and willing to do what your asked to do, you will receive all of your ratings and put yourself into a job that is almost all multi-engine instructing, there is no faster way to the airlines. Go into this unprepared and unwilling to change your schedule at a moments notice, and you will have spent 30 grand, received your ratings but missed out on one of the best multi-engine instructing jobs available. Good luck,

D
 

ifly4food

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I don't know about the ATL AllATPs but I've known people from other ALL ATPs across the country who had good experiences.

My comment is that you may not want to spend all that money for an "accelerated program" right now. What would you be accelerating toward? There isn't much hiring of those without airline experience right now.
Yes, several have mentioned that "seniority is everything" which was true back in the late 90s when hiring was a frenzy and most people who met the "minimums" had an excellent chance of getting hired. Now, with thousands of experienced airline pilots out of work, the days of getting hired at the minimums are over for a while. It will be much more competetive, and without airline experience, I'm not sure you will be competetive.

If I were in your position, I'd work slowly through a local FBO for my ratings and keep a regular job until the industry picks back up. It will be much cheaper that way, and time is on your side.
If things turn around quicker than expected, you can always enroll in AllATPs later.
G' luck
 

skydiverdriver

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I'm not so sure it's any cheaper, but if you get a cfi job out of it, that is what you are accellerating toward. Who knows, if the job market opens up in two years and you are still training, then what will you think? Some airlines are hiring right now, and you could be lucky. I think it's worth it, and perhaps I was stupid, but I spent much more going the long way.
 

bobbysamd

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Accelerated programs v. slowpokes

You should be more concerned is if a program will be thorough and comprehensive and not necessarily fast. I appreciate all the points made that accelerated training is like real-world airline training, i.e. drinking from the proverbial firehose. On the other hand, when you are on the learning curve and are trying to absorb unfamiliar new concepts, your mind needs a break to catch up with it. I also would be concerned that even though you're given all the materials from which to learn that you might be prepared only to pass checkrides.

You do want to be concerned that you will work steadily through the program and make steady progress, as opposed to training in a big spurt and laying off for a while. Momentum is key.

I do like the idea of All-ATP's cross-country program. Too many other programs' cross-countries barely get you out of the traffic pattern.

Ifly raises a point about the need for going through an accelerated program at this point in time. Hiring will be slow; why not go a little slower yourself and enjoy the experience?

Above all, no matter where or how you train, try to ensure that a CFI job will be waiting for you at that place.

Good luck with your training.
 

LR25

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Whatever happened to going out to the airport and finding an instructor?

Why would you spend all that money when you can do it at the fraction of that price?

Just wondering.

I dont think you get many free rides in this business, I wouldnt go into debt for years to see if you can get a free ride, whats the hurry?
 

flyboy

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Well, it depends on how you look at I guess. I know of people who went the FBO route and ended up taking 4 months to get there initial CFI and payed about 6k for it. At least with the 2 week programs, you keep it under a price cap and are forced to study hard. By the time you get to getting your CFI, you've already dished out a lot of cash for training. Yeah, it has a lot to do with your personal learning curve, but after 4 years of college followed by 7 straight months of flight school, i'd rather just get it done.
 
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